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Jan 1st 2020, 04:07 PM   #1
 
  Oct 2019
  SW WA

Suspension work recommendations

Want to get my forks shortened about an inch, anyone know a good shop?

The forks are from a SYM Wolf 150, which most places won’t touch. Parts are overpriced and take at least a month to ship.
Jan 1st 2020, 05:24 PM   #2
 Flyboymedic's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Hazel Dell, Wa

  Honda VFR800, Husqvarna TE 610, Ducati Hypermotard 1100S, Suzuki VStrom 650, Yamaha Radian, MZ 125SM
Pro Motion Suspension over by Costco, next to Setin High School. I just had my Husqvarna forks worked on and he fixed an issue that another suspension guy in Port Orchards caused. The forks feel SOOOO much better. The problem is, I'm guessing it'll cost around $200 to get it done and you'll have to decide if you really want to put the money into that bike.
Although not ideal, another alternative might be to buy lowering dogbones for another bike that will fit yours (assuming they aren't made for a Sym), and then raise the forks up in the clamps making the bike shorter.
I just did a google search and the top link might be helpful to you. It requires a Sym forum login that I don't intend to join, but might be worth checking out to see what they did.
https://www.google.com/search?rlz=1C...4dUDCAs&uact=5

Edited by Flyboymedic on Jan 1st 2020 at 05:27 PM
Jan 2nd 2020, 06:07 PM   #3
 
  Oct 2019
  SW WA

I was expecting it to run me $2-300. Totally worth it to have them machined by a pro. I’m a member of the SYM forum, that login screen is a new issue that members can’t get past. Think it’s an admin login, which sucks because all the knowledge owners compiled is now unobtainable. Most of the people there just let the tubes stick out the top of the triple. My problem is that I plan on mounting my clip on’s below the top triple tree, which would leave the tubes sticking out 2+inches.

Edited by doombug on Jan 2nd 2020 at 06:51 PM
Jan 2nd 2020, 07:22 PM   #4
 Flyboymedic's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Hazel Dell, Wa

  Honda VFR800, Husqvarna TE 610, Ducati Hypermotard 1100S, Suzuki VStrom 650, Yamaha Radian, MZ 125SM
Although I'm not a fan of longer dogbones, they're great for a rider that isn't going to tax the suspension and it's a cheaper workaround that can easily be removed later if skill dictates it or selling the bike. Oftentimes those Chinese bikes are copies of Japanese bikes and I'd be willing to bet that there are links from, say a Honda or Kawasaki KLR or an older Ninja 250/500, or other bike that would fit. They could even be potentially made depending on how they're shaped. Keep us informed with what you do. I enjoy this kind of stuff.

Oh, and I totally forgot- if you have your forks shortened, you'll have to get your shock shortened as well otherwise you'll have other problems. That's another $200ish. So the dogbones really make sense and is what most people do. Just gotta figure out what will work if there's no aftermarket links.

Edited by Flyboymedic on Jan 2nd 2020 at 07:29 PM
Jan 2nd 2020, 08:23 PM   #5
 
  Oct 2019
  SW WA

No bones on this bike, old school dual rear shocks. As far as geometry is concerned, I can lower the front 1.5inches without creating a death trap. At least that’s what I was told by someone on the forum that I trust. There’s only a few guys on the forum that have complete technical knowledge of this bike and he is one of them. Canadian dude that builds custom Wolfs in Taiwan.
Jan 2nd 2020, 08:50 PM   #6
 Flyboymedic's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Hazel Dell, Wa

  Honda VFR800, Husqvarna TE 610, Ducati Hypermotard 1100S, Suzuki VStrom 650, Yamaha Radian, MZ 125SM
Ah, gotcha. You would still need to compensate the rear shocks somehow for a level ride and that could possibly be done by cutting them slightly, try 1/4 of a coil at a time so as not to go too much. This would stiffen the overall feel and depending on your weight might be a problem, or it could be exactly what you want.

I'm curious- what is the reason you're wanting to lower the bike? Is it just too tall for you or for looks?
Jan 3rd 2020, 01:57 AM   #7
 
  Oct 2019
  SW WA

Purely aesthetics. I wouldn’t dream of chopping up an original 70’s Honda CB. That’s why I bought the newer knock off, updated reliability with same classic look.

When I first bought it


Progress so far
Jan 3rd 2020, 11:11 AM   #8
 Flyboymedic's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Hazel Dell, Wa

  Honda VFR800, Husqvarna TE 610, Ducati Hypermotard 1100S, Suzuki VStrom 650, Yamaha Radian, MZ 125SM
Cool. Looks like a fun around town bike. I've got an MZ 125SM for around town. Fun bike, but I have 6 and need to get rid of a few and it may go in the future. I've also got a Yamaha Radian which is my project bike.
I'll bet that you have progressive rate springs in your forks and when/if you modify your forks it might behoove you to cut the progressive part off first which would make them straight rate and effectively make them stiffer. (You might have to anyway so that the forks don't bottom out.) As I mentioned above, by cutting off part of a coil or more on the rear, you'd be stiffening the rear to more match the front and thereby lowering the bike evenly. Oh, I almost forgot- realize that with all the shortening, you'll have to compensate your kick-stand by shortening it too! Modify one thing and other things need to compensate too. I also noticed you have good taste in ginger beer. Bundaberg for the win! Anyway, keep us updated on what you decide to do and your progress.

Edited by Flyboymedic on Jan 3rd 2020 at 11:17 AM
Jan 3rd 2020, 01:41 PM   #9
 
  Oct 2019
  SW WA

Makes sense, one of the many reasons I wanted a pro to do them. I have the basic understanding and am mechanically inclined, but I dont want to unnecessarily risk my life haha Figured I'd have to by an adjustable kickstand(not enough experience welding)
Jan 29th 2020, 06:03 PM   #10
 
  Oct 2019
  SW WA

Good call, Bob knows his stuff. He’s going to add a bushing to shorten the fork, cut the spring to match/make them single rate if I do have progressive, and replace the seals/increase oil weight. Should have them back on the bike next week.
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Feb 2nd 2020, 02:31 PM   #11
 
  Oct 2019
  SW WA

Had them finished in only 4 days and they are perfect. Quoted $200-300, paid $202. Thank you for the recommendation.

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Mar 5th 2020, 02:45 PM   #12
 Flyboymedic's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Hazel Dell, Wa

  Honda VFR800, Husqvarna TE 610, Ducati Hypermotard 1100S, Suzuki VStrom 650, Yamaha Radian, MZ 125SM
I saw you on I-5 today near the 39th exit! I was on the blue VStrom.
Mar 6th 2020, 06:19 PM   #13
 
  Oct 2019
  SW WA

Haha nice. I like to hop on I-5 south when getting coffee downtown. Mostly downhill, so I can push the bike past 70mph haha
Mar 6th 2020, 06:53 PM   #14
 Parilla125's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  SeaTac

Nice looking bike! Good price on the work. I will keep them in mind for future projects.
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