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  • 1 Post By 2wheel-Will
  • 2 Post By motorooster
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Apr 12th 2016, 01:43 PM   #1
 
  Jan 2016
  Portland

Portland area is off to a bad start...

Two fatal accidents yesterday - one in Beaverton and one in Clackamas county. I think this is five fatal accidents in two weeks in the metro area. So far indications in all five incidents is rider error.

Ride smart. Its early in the season.
Apr 12th 2016, 02:15 PM   #2
 
  Jan 2016
  Beaverton

  2015 Kawasaki Ninja ZX6R, 2014 Kawasaki Ninja EX300 CRF250x, CRF150RB. XR100
There is still gravel around. Check your ride, tire condition, pressure. Lights oil level etc..
Always always scan your surroundings. Lets no have anymore losses.
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Apr 13th 2016, 12:10 PM   #3
 motorooster's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Portland

  V-Strom DL1000, ZZR1200, TE610E, YZ250
Quote:
Originally Posted by BMWWill
There is still gravel around. Check your ride, tire condition, pressure. Lights oil level etc..
Always always scan your surroundings. Lets no have anymore losses.
Yes, it's good to watch for gravel and to ensure your bike is working properly. But more important is having a good game plan and strong fundamentals. Before for the start of riding season, I always make a point of reading through a riding skills book or two. For me at least, having good advice on how to ride rattling my brain translates into more confidence on the road and fewer mistakes.

My favorite so far is Lee Parks' Total Control, which he just updated last year.
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Apr 13th 2016, 03:09 PM   #4
 BlueSteel's Avatar
 
  Apr 2016
  US

Quote:
Originally Posted by BMWWill
There is still gravel around. Check your ride, tire condition, pressure. Lights oil level etc..
Always always scan your surroundings. Lets no have anymore losses.
There is definitely plenty of gravels out there, especially arround corners. if you are unfamiliar with a road just take it easy, until you are ready, your life matter!

Sent via SAMSUNG-SM-G900A
Apr 13th 2016, 03:51 PM   #5
 
  Jan 2016
  Portland

Quote:
Originally Posted by motorooster
Yes, it's good to watch for gravel and to ensure your bike is working properly. But more important is having a good game plan and strong fundamentals. Before for the start of riding season, I always make a point of reading through a riding skills book or two. For me at least, having good advice on how to ride rattling my brain translates into more confidence on the road and fewer mistakes.

My favorite so far is Lee Parks' Total Control, which he just updated last year.
Good point on reading some books. I just re-read Smooth Riding by Reg Pridmore. Gave me a couple of things to think about and work on.
Apr 13th 2016, 11:29 PM   #6
 
  Jan 2016
  Beaverton

  '13 636, '14 N1k, DR650
Ah, hell, I'll throw some gas on this flame.

Poor road conditions rarely cause an incident. 100 times out of 100 it's rider REACTION (read: error) that causes an incident - not the actual road itself. (Very slight facetiousness here)

Source: For those unawares, I don't own a 4 wheeled vehicle. For the past 3 years, I get around - year-round on a 2-wheeled vehicle, yet I haven't had a rider-at-fault accident in over 36 months. At this point in my riding career, I'm comfortable riding my "sport" bike over gravel (purposefully) so that I might kick it outta the way of the next guy.

If someone you know stopped driving their car in September, you wouldn't be surprised when they crashed their car when they started driving again 6 months later (in March).

Why do we act surprised when this happens on bikes?

Edited by Andenthal on Apr 14th 2016 at 12:15 AM Reason: grammar and such
Apr 14th 2016, 05:38 AM   #7
 BlueSteel's Avatar
 
  Apr 2016
  US

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andenthal
Ah, hell, I'll throw some gas on this flame.

Poor road conditions rarely cause an incident. 100 times out of 100 it's rider REACTION (read: error) that causes an incident - not the actual road itself. (Very slight facetiousness here)

Source: For those unawares, I don't own a 4 wheeled vehicle. For the past 3 years, I get around - year-round on a 2-wheeled vehicle, yet I haven't had a rider-at-fault accident in over 36 months. At this point in my riding career, I'm comfortable riding my "sport" bike over gravel (purposefully) so that I might kick it outta the way of the next guy.

If someone you know stopped driving their car in September, you wouldn't be surprised when they crashed their car when they started driving again 6 months later (in March).

Why do we act surprised when this happens on bikes?
I agree with you about riders reaction, the reaction will de-stabilize the bike...

Sent via SAMSUNG-SM-G900A
Apr 14th 2016, 12:01 PM   #8
 motorooster's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Portland

  V-Strom DL1000, ZZR1200, TE610E, YZ250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andenthal
Ah, hell, I'll throw some gas on this flame.

Poor road conditions rarely cause an incident. 100 times out of 100 it's rider REACTION (read: error) that causes an incident - not the actual road itself. (Very slight facetiousness here)

Source: For those unawares, I don't own a 4 wheeled vehicle. For the past 3 years, I get around - year-round on a 2-wheeled vehicle, yet I haven't had a rider-at-fault accident in over 36 months. At this point in my riding career, I'm comfortable riding my "sport" bike over gravel (purposefully) so that I might kick it outta the way of the next guy.

If someone you know stopped driving their car in September, you wouldn't be surprised when they crashed their car when they started driving again 6 months later (in March).

Why do we act surprised when this happens on bikes?
Well put. I agree that the risk presented by gravel is not all that great. Bigger problems are leaves, moss, oil, ice and wet sandy patches. A skilled rider can negotiate all those without problem, which is where the riding skills books and/or classes can be helpful. Time on a dirt bike where the surface is inherently unstable is also a great way to learn how to handle a little slippage.
Apr 14th 2016, 02:23 PM   #9
MAR
 MAR's Avatar
 
  Feb 2016
  Portland

I've had two big accidents, out-riding the road and target fixation.

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