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Aug 18th 2016, 10:12 AM   #1
 ShootPDX's Avatar
 
  May 2016
  Happy Valley area (Clackamas)

  SV650S Silver - HD 1250 Hammer Sportster w/Screaming Eagle stuff - GSXR-750 K12
Another fatality last night got me thinking about why we do this

We had another motorcyclist die last night and it always begs the question...knowing the risk...why do so many of us continue to do power-sports? I've had very dear friends get badly hurt....Folks I never got a chance to really even get out and ride with. And I'm not here to answer the question for the riding community at large. At the end of the day your entire life is managed risk. You get out of bed in the morning and you have no idea whether or not you're going to stroke out and die right on your own bathroom floor. You can choose to live your life in a very risk-free and passive mode but I can tell you...I can't imagine what that kind of life would be like. Personally I don't ride for some type of adrenaline rush or thrill...over the years I have pretty much beaten the adrenal response out of my psyche. I don't necessarily ride for the camaraderie or community either...because a lot of times I enjoy just getting out by myself on some back road. If I had to give you a single definitive answer I would say I ride simply to get better at riding. Some of that entails chasing people around who ride a lot better than me. There is a significant amount of risk in that... Although most of it...I think...is...are they going to continue to wait for me at the top of that next ridge? And I'm totally fine with that. You want to know something else there's a ton of risk in just doing the same thing over and over again and not learning and expanding your boundaries. I believe that riding continuously with the same people is a recipe for total disaster. Life is experiential and we need the entire sum of the community at large to moderate our experience. I am very blessed to have been fortunate enough to find some people here and there who have taught me so many different things and given me so many different perspectives and I'm grateful to each and every one of you!
craiger likes this.

Edited by ShootPDX on Aug 18th 2016 at 09:06 PM
Aug 18th 2016, 10:32 AM   #2
 jared p's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  here

  there
you can exist or you can live. you can be healthy and die at 40 or unhealthy and die at 90, it's a crap shoot. while you lay on your death bed would you rather think of regrets or memories?
Aug 18th 2016, 10:47 AM   #3
 Tripledij's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Custer WA

  Aprilia Tuono 1100
I have a better perspective about this after having read the story Knanthrup posted


This Man's Story Is A Reminder To Live While You're Alive
KNanthrup and DarthVader like this.
Aug 18th 2016, 11:38 AM   #4
 
  Jan 2016
  Portland

I go through life believing I'm bulletproof and bad things only happen to other people. It has worked so far.

I stopped riding when I had young kids because risk > reward. Now reward > risk. Not much more to it than that.

About the same way I assess anything I do. Navel-gazing much deeper than that isn't in my DNA.
Aug 18th 2016, 12:16 PM   #5
 ltlpagan's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Vancouver WA

  2010 Ducati Monster 696
I'd rather die doing it, than live without it.
Aug 18th 2016, 12:21 PM   #6
 wooden's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  PDX

  '14 St3R, '05 DR650
The only reason I can think of to not ride a motorcycle is fear. Fear is good, but you should never let it control you.

If you're not scaring yourself occasionally, you're not trying hard enough.

Push the envelope, watch it bend.
Aug 18th 2016, 12:21 PM   #7
 Transported's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Portland

  2006 FZ1, 1999 R1
I once watched a compilation of street motorcycle accidents. I learned how things can go wrong fast and maybe a little on how to avoid them.

But, over all, it just made me afraid of anything and everything and took away a lot of the joy of riding.

I don't watch those videos anymore.
Candiya, sunofnun, MMcN49 and 3 others like this.

Edited by Transported on Aug 18th 2016 at 03:09 PM
Aug 18th 2016, 12:34 PM   #8
 Scribbles's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  NW

There are many activities that may be just as dangerous as motorcycles.

Your Chances of Dying & Other Health Risks

Canoeing, boating and mountaineering are probably on par with bikes.

According to the chart, climbing Everest (above 6000 meters) has a 1 in 10 chance of death.

Edited by Scribbles on Aug 18th 2016 at 12:37 PM
Aug 18th 2016, 01:45 PM   #9
 DocB's Avatar
 
  Feb 2016
  Poulsbo, WA

  Aprilia RSV Mille, CB77 (AMA Nat'l landspeed record holder), CB750K, CB750F
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scribbles
There are many activities that may be just as dangerous as motorcycles.

According to the chart, climbing Everest (above 6000 meters) has a 1 in 10 chance of death.
Yeah, but how many died riding motorcycles on Everest?
larsvons and fiveohford like this.
Aug 18th 2016, 02:17 PM   #10
 Josh's Avatar
 
  Jul 2016
  The Couv

Quote:
Originally Posted by jared p
you can exist or you can live. you can be healthy and die at 40 or unhealthy and die at 90, it's a crap shoot. while you lay on your death bed would you rather think of regrets or memories?
+1, even after my near fatal wreck I'd rather go splat doing things I love and fill my life with excitement than live a long lame life.

I guess if I ever have kids, I'll probably ride less to spend more time with them and make sure I'm around until they at least turn 18...but then back on the rocket, LOL.
Aug 18th 2016, 02:37 PM   #11
 Sentinel's Avatar
 
  Jun 2016
  Poor Tortured

  2013 Kawasaki Ninja 1000 Harlequin
i notice all the time how many close calls are in each ride. sometimes more and sometimes fewer and not always depending on my own behaviour. that said - slowing down makes for a much different ride. i have noticed that differential speed is as important as absolute speed; i do NOT go fast in one lane when the other is clogged with traffic. uh uuuuhhhh. day before yesterday on the back road from Port Orchard to Gig Harbor, right at the county line, a guy in a no shit wood-sided station wagon is pulling out of his driveway on my left. i am going maybe 45 in a 35 and we see each other because I can see that he had been rolling, but has stopped with his nose in the lane to my left as I approach his driveway. but exactly as I am getting to where he is - he pulls right the fuck out in front of me. as if on purpose. i had to swing it out over the fog line and almost into the dirt to not hit his front right bumper. i was ready, and not going too fast. but if I had been zooming by at 75...blam-o.
Aug 18th 2016, 02:55 PM   #12
 larsvons's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  PDX

  '15 KLZ1000, '03 SV650S
Quote:
Originally Posted by DocB
Yeah, but how many died riding motorcycles on Everest?
Now we are getting to the real issues.
tod701, Scribbles and Greg like this.
Aug 18th 2016, 03:01 PM   #13
 
  Jan 2016
  Lynnwood WA

  2007 Yamaha FZ6, 2008 Aprilia Tuono & 2009 Yamaha WR250R
Dunno where I read this, but it fits me to a T. "When I was younger I was afraid I'd die riding. Now that I'm old and falling apart, I'm afraid I won't."
Aug 18th 2016, 03:25 PM   #14
 
  Jan 2016
  Newcastle, WA

  1995 Suzuki Katana
Quote:
Originally Posted by Transported
I once watched a compilation of street motorcycle accidents. I learned how things can go wrong fast and maybe a little on how to avoid them.

But, over all, it just made me afraid of anything and everything and took away a lot of the joy of riding.

I don't watch those videos anymore.
I watch them all the time. Doesn't change my enjoyment one bit. It's your mind, you get to decide how and how much external stimuli effects your actions.

What watching them does do is show me what to watch for and, many times, how NOT to ride.

Sent via SM-N900T
Parilla125, tod701 and elSueco like this.
Aug 18th 2016, 03:28 PM   #15
 
  Jan 2016
  Newcastle, WA

  1995 Suzuki Katana
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scribbles
There are many activities that may be just as dangerous as motorcycles.

Your Chances of Dying & Other Health Risks

Canoeing, boating and mountaineering are probably on par with bikes.

According to the chart, climbing Everest (above 6000 meters) has a 1 in 10 chance of death.
Everest: The numbers I've seen always hover around 1 in 10.

1 makes it to the top for every 10 who try.

1 dies for every 10 who try.

Makes motorcycling seem downright safe....

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