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Aug 1st 2018, 03:40 PM   #16
 unicykle's Avatar
 
  Sep 2017
  milwaukie oregon

  gsxr600 gsxr750 gsxr1000 i like gsxrs
Im pretty competive or at least used to be and if i had rode with fast riders while trying to learn id be dead so be carefull who you ride with and dont try to keep up. Kieth code” A twist of the wrist “ is a good start.
Aug 1st 2018, 04:24 PM   #17
 Chrishil54's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Kirkland

  2009 V-Star 1100 Custom
Things I'd add:
  • Take an introductory course to see if you really want to ride.
  • Take the basic rider safety course.
  • Get good insurance and keep it current.
  • Don't go for flashy/fad/high priced equipment to start with. Used clothing isn't bad.
  • Don't get a used helmet. It's just not worth the potential problems.
  • Get a full face helmet that fits properly for your head shape AND size.
  • Get a pinlock equipped visor in your helmet.
  • Get help with properly fitting a helmet.
  • Get rain gear. You're going to hit rain during a ride at some point.
  • Get a small, used bike to start with, then after your comfortable pushing the envelope with it, look at larger bikes.
  • Start each ride with the mental attitude of "Who's going to try and run me over this time".
  • Prepare yourself as you are going to go down at least once while riding.
  • Get life flight insurance for your area. It's better to pay it and never use it than need it and not have it.
There are advantages of classes. If you pass the basic rider course, you get a card that waives the DOL testing for your endorsement. It also can get you lower insurance rates.


Aug 1st 2018, 06:29 PM   #18
 Sentinel's Avatar
 
  Jun 2016
  Poor Tortured

  2015 Kawasaki Concours 14 - The Origame Sea-Dragon
I don't know...

Classes are a thing.

I get that many guys are into the whole class thing.

But I never went to any classes other than the mandatory parking-lot-swervies class for the Navy that I skated through in 1981 so I can't say.

I don't feel like I missed anything.

I've crashed my ass off a few times, but I'got hundreds of thousands of miles of riding in me so it's probably inevitable, odds-wise.

Although, I can say from intimate experience that it was always my own riding, mostly speed, that got me crashed.

At least, it was always at least partly my fault. And mostly they have all been fault of judgement rather than skill. But when you find yourself over your head and headed to going on your ass on the street, mostly it happens like BLAM! You're fucked before you know it, which is weird to say because sometimes it happens in excruciatingly slow motion at the same time, like a weird two-speed time thing......

But if you ride sanely, and if you ride the normal speeds you'd drive a car at, it's a whole different experience and a whole lot safer than the Hooligan Way. You could go a long time without getting into trouble.
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Aug 2nd 2018, 05:41 AM   #19
 Texasl's Avatar
Moderator
 
  Jan 2016
  Northeast Olalla

  07 Guzzi
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sentinel
I don't know...

Classes are a thing.

I get that many guys are into the whole class thing.

But I never went to any classes other than the mandatory parking-lot-swervies class for the Navy that I skated through in 1981 so I can't say.

I don't feel like I missed anything.

I've crashed my ass off a few times, but I'got hundreds of thousands of miles of riding in me so it's probably inevitable, odds-wise.

Although, I can say from intimate experience that it was always my own riding, mostly speed, that got me crashed.

At least, it was always at least partly my fault. And mostly they have all been fault of judgement rather than skill. But when you find yourself over your head and headed to going on your ass on the street, mostly it happens like BLAM! You're fucked before you know it, which is weird to say because sometimes it happens in excruciatingly slow motion at the same time, like a weird two-speed time thing......

But if you ride sanely, and if you ride the normal speeds you'd drive a car at, it's a whole different experience and a whole lot safer than the Hooligan Way. You could go a long time without getting into trouble.
Even, or perhaps especially, "senior" riders such as yourself can benefit from continuing training, refreshing the skills that may have depreciated and rewrapping your head around the fine points. Trust me, training has gotten exponentially better than the 1981 vintage one handed figure eights that we did under the old program.
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Aug 2nd 2018, 03:43 PM   #20
 Chrishil54's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Kirkland

  2009 V-Star 1100 Custom
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texasl
Trust me, training has gotten exponentially better than the 1981 vintage one handed figure eights that we did under the old program.
Here I thought it was squeeze the knees so you don't fall off the Dinosaur during sudden direction changes...
Aug 2nd 2018, 04:39 PM   #21
 Suzuki Stevo's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Seattle ,Wa

  Burgman 400, TW200, Boulevard M50, 2018 Indian Scout 1131, 2018 Indian Chieftain Classic
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeteN95
Welcome and try to get some time on a small dirt bike. You will learn a lot with little danger.
Oh helz yes!...there is nothing better than having Muscle Memory take over when both feet are on the pegs...in a full steering lock slide...and you didn't even have to think about it, that's just one of the things riding a dirt bike will do for you
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Aug 2nd 2018, 07:28 PM   #22
 Sentinel's Avatar
 
  Jun 2016
  Poor Tortured

  2015 Kawasaki Concours 14 - The Origame Sea-Dragon
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suzuki Stevo
Oh helz yes!...there is nothing better than having Muscle Memory take over when both feet are on the pegs...in a full steering lock slide...and you didn't even have to think about it, that's just one of the things riding a dirt bike will do for you
Yeah, that's REALLY the trick. You learn most of your mechanical skills on a small dirt bike: what the different braking combinations do, traction and loss of traction, counter-steering, sliding without crashing, WHEELIES, jumps, how to power over shit and why its often better to go faster rather than slower in situations, how to manage power, turning without crashing, how there's a LOT of ways to ride a motorcycle.

so, yeah, what he said.
Aug 6th 2018, 06:03 AM   #23
 Texasl's Avatar
Moderator
 
  Jan 2016
  Northeast Olalla

  07 Guzzi
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chrishil54
Here I thought it was squeeze the knees so you don't fall off the Dinosaur during sudden direction changes...
Back in "the day" if you had the velociraptor properly trained you were directing the course changes, not anticipating them.
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