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Jul 22nd 2018, 11:09 PM   #1
 
  Jul 2018
  Pierce County

New to everything

Hello! I am new to this site and to the lovely world of biking. I dont have my endorsement yet but am working on it. If anyone has any suggestions, please feel free to let me hear them. thanks.
Jul 23rd 2018, 07:18 AM   #2
 Texasl's Avatar
Moderator
 
  Jan 2016
  Northeast Olalla

  07 Guzzi
If you have not yet signed up for a basic rider class get busy and get enrolled. Puget Sound Safety is the local training organization in your area, and they are top notch.

Things that you can do before your class:
  • Try to put your finger on what you want to do with a motorcycle.
  • Go to numerous dealerships and sit on as many bikes as you can to get a feel for size and fit.
  • Have a heart to heart with yourself about how well you play with traffic. (That will help with the decision on what type of bike your need.)
  • Start learning about real riding gear vs. stylish.
Parilla125, 307T and Bald Guy like this.
Jul 23rd 2018, 07:24 AM   #3
 Andonon's Avatar
 
  Jul 2018
  Mill Creek

  06 SV650S
Street or cruiser?
Jul 23rd 2018, 07:31 AM   #4
 Bald Guy's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Kennewick

  KTM SAR Husqvarna Strada, Ural Patrol and a shit load of BN125
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texasl
If you have not yet signed up for a basic rider class get busy and get enrolled. Puget Sound Safety is the local training organization in your area, and they are top notch.

Things that you can do before your class:
  • Try to put your finger on what you want to do with a motorcycle.
  • Go to numerous dealerships and sit on as many bikes as you can to get a feel for size and fit.
  • Have a heart to heart with yourself about how well you play with traffic. (That will help with the decision on what type of bike your need.)
  • Start learning about real riding gear vs. stylish.
Also:

Don't invest a lot of money in gear/motorcycle and such prior to class. You may find out it is not your thing.

Regardless of your pathway to endorsement, and no matter how many years you ride, always, always be honest with yourself about your level of skills you possess, then ride within those skills. Many riders delude themselves right up to the moment they crash.

It's not always the "Other Guy's" fault. It is not always yours, but you are the only one responsible for your well being. Never depend on others. Trust their actions, not your perception of what you think they will do.

Be the best rider you can be. You owe that to yourself and those who depend on you.

Buy the best gear you can afford, for the purpose it will be used.

Get ready for what can be the most fun activity of your life.
Well, an activity that is participated in with your clothes on, anyhow!

Keep us in the loop!

Dusty
Texasl, 307T and 1090yoyo like this.

Edited by Bald Guy on Jul 23rd 2018 at 07:33 AM
Jul 23rd 2018, 07:38 AM   #5
 TREX600's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Custer, WA

  Suzuki 09 GSXR 1000 Suzuki 09 DRZ 400SM 1970 Yamaha 250 DT1 Enduro
Welcome
Jul 23rd 2018, 08:35 AM   #6
 ltlpagan's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Vancouver WA

  2010 Ducati Monster 696
Welcome
Jul 23rd 2018, 01:20 PM   #7
 PeteN95's Avatar
Moderator
 
  Jan 2016
  Muklilteo, WA

  Suzuki DL1000, Honda XR650R, KTM 250 XC-W
Welcome and try to get some time on a small dirt bike. You will learn a lot with little danger.
Jul 23rd 2018, 01:22 PM   #8
 WarpShatner7's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Here

You'll get a lot of good advice, but the two most important things, IMO, are:

1. Situational awareness. A rider is constantly watching for things to go wrong, and develops an instinct for where problems are going to come from and rides/stops/places the bike accordingly.
2. Master control of your bike. In particular, be able to stop abruptly in unexpected circumstances without falling over, and really, really practice those low-speed maneuvers.

A couple of small things I've found useful:

Every now and then while riding if there's no one close by, practice avoiding imaginary or surrogate objects in the road: Pretend that manhole cover or grease spot is an old muffler and practice your safe swerving technique. (You learn this in the MSF course.) You'll thank yourself when you suddenly come upon a real one and you handle it reflexively.

When going around a curve, pay attention to how countersteering works. Notice how you can pull with the outside hand, press with the inside hand. Feel the effects of shifting your weight on the seat and pegs. It's amazing how many experienced riders don't really know they're countersteering, they're just doing it unconciously because eventually your body figures out what works even if your brain doesn't. But thinking about it actually helps you make better decisions.
Texasl, Parilla125 and 1090yoyo like this.
Jul 28th 2018, 01:07 PM   #9
 WarpShatner7's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Here

One small tip, reinforced the other day: If you're on the brake at an intersection, stay on it -- i.e. keep the brake light lit -- until it's time to move. Given that most cars are automatics these days and only stay stopped while the brake pedal's pressed, when the brake light goes out the the driver behind you sometimes reflexively moves forward. Not pretty.
MarvTravis likes this.
Jul 28th 2018, 01:27 PM   #10
 VeritasImageryNW's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Allyn, WA

  '06 HD Street Bob, '85 Yamaha FJ600, '99 Honda CBR600f4
Always assume one of two things, either no one can see you or everyone is out to kill you. This has saved my butt too many times to count.

Riding a bike is about 100% concentration. The moment you get below that and get complacent is usually the time shit goes wrong.

Ride your own ride. Don't let others dictate how fast you're gonna go. It's better to arrive at your destination late than not at all.

And ride because you love bikes, not because you think it makes you look cool.

Sent via SM-G950U
Jul 28th 2018, 04:36 PM   #11
 Sentinel's Avatar
 
  Jun 2016
  Poor Tortured

  2015 Kawasaki Concours 14 - The Origame Sea-Dragon
Only one piece of free advice I'd give a new guy that I think is true for everyone:

Don't fucking drink and ride.

You are gonna LOVE motorcycling. Hell yeah!
Jul 31st 2018, 09:31 PM   #12
 liberpolly's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Seattle

  Ducati Diavel, Aprilia Scarabeo
Take a class. Then take another class. Keep taking classes, they're fun!
Texasl, Parilla125 and Chrishil54 like this.
Aug 1st 2018, 07:22 AM   #13
 Texasl's Avatar
Moderator
 
  Jan 2016
  Northeast Olalla

  07 Guzzi
Quote:
Originally Posted by liberpolly
Take a class. Then take another class. Keep taking classes, they're fun!
This goes for everyone on this forum. Keep training to knock the rust off of the skills that you don't use every day.
Aug 1st 2018, 10:07 AM   #14
 Parilla125's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  SeaTac

If you ride in a group there is MORE responsibility and things (bikes) to watch out for. It is very easy to fall into the groove of allowing the person in front of you to be your eyes/set the pace and not watch as careful for trouble. Then you both crash.
As was stated, don't go buy an expensive bike before you are sure it is for you. There are always a number of bikes a few years old for sale that have very few miles on them because new riders buy a bike then find out getting run off the road on a regular basis, having people trying to kill you, getting wet, bugs hitting you and getting 'power scared' is a little too intense and not for them. And the bike sits. And their skills diminish. A few years (or more) they sell it.
You will get startled and have the crap scared out of you at some point early in your riding. You might give it up, or you might give it another try and work through it, deciding the freedom and fun of riding is worth it.
I have been riding for what, 51 years? I have run the gamut of bikes and styles and still like them all. Scooter to big twin (various brands including HD) chopper to cruiser, dirt to street, two stroke and four stroke.
I think riding a small lightweight easy to ride bike well still beats being a sloppy rider on a bigger overpowered difficult to maneuver bike. Learn to ride something easy first.
It is an exclusive club and pretty tight over all. Best of luck!
WarpShatner7 likes this.

Edited by Parilla125 on Aug 1st 2018 at 10:09 AM
Aug 1st 2018, 03:00 PM   #15
 Dash Riprock's Avatar
 
  Apr 2018
  N Idaho

  Yamaha 650
First of all well done for even asking for advice and not just diving in like some middle aged jackass would have done about 50 years ago. That had some painful lesson's, for SWIM of course!

Seriously I consider the inside of my helmet my happy place. Motorcycling fixes stuff in my head I didn't realize was broke.

Remember ATGATT, no bottle and throttle, and ride with the idea like cagers are trying to hit you, which sounds depressing but gets to be second nature. Always ride the ride you want to have, not anyone elses. You are under no obligation to fit in or keep up with other riders.

Welcome, I LOVE hearing about new riders. This will be awesome!
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