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Jun 18th 2016, 04:49 PM   #1
 Suzuki Stevo's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Seattle ,Wa

  Burgman 400, TW200, Boulevard M50, 2018 Indian Scout 1131, 2018 Indian Chieftain Classic
Yamaha TW200

I think I wanna trade in wunna my bikes for one of these

Rustydust likes this.
Jun 18th 2016, 05:28 PM   #2
 Parilla125's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  SeaTac

I have a 2000. The last year of kick start and drum front brake. From 1986 to 2000 they remained unchanged except colors. In 2001 they changed the carb to a more conventional one, put on a bigger alternator, dropped the kick starter, put on a front disk brake. I can't think of any other mods right now.
I bought mine new and have had no trouble with it. I think the drum brake is adequate but would prefer the disk. I like having the kick starter on mine though...
Most people put the big rack on the back which gives plenty of room. I also put a front rack on mine. There are two styles. Above the headlight or below it. Mine is 'above' so the headlight is not blocked with a load on it. Both WILL make the steering a bit more heavy feeling and slower even when empty.
These bikes are not speed demons and the engine does not lend itself to larger displacement easily. Swapping is difficult as the primary sprocket is offset to accommodate the big rear tire with the outer gear case having a bearing to support the long output shaft. That means pulling the side case to swap primary sprockets.
I have gone from a 45 tooth rear for more highway riding to a 70 tooth (on it now) for slow trail riding. I have a 60 tooth waiting to be put on. 47 rear is stock. Sprocket Supply can cut any sprocket you want for any bike, split them in half and put two master links through them for proper spacing. Now you can change sprockets without pulling the rear tire.
The 45 was good for 55 mph with short runs to 60-65 mph but it was wound pretty tight. The stock tires howl LOUDLY at that speed.
The other thing those huge tires do is throw whatever you are riding through everywhere. Mostly your legs. First time I went through deep water and mud with a little speed I had to concentrate on riding out of it while laughing hysterically because of the ridiculous amount of mud and water it threw all over me. I would probably buy another if I didn't have mine.
Jun 18th 2016, 08:30 PM   #3
 cool1442's Avatar
 
  Mar 2016
  North of CDA

  KTM 950 Super Enduro, Honda XR 650R
I sold some of the early models. They can be a little bouncy (due to fat tires) on bumpy steep down hills if you get too much speed. They last forever
Jun 18th 2016, 08:37 PM   #4
 Bald Guy's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Kennewick

  Versys 1000 SE LT+, Ural Patrol and a shit load of BN125
I have one in my training fleet. Love that damn thing! I put some street biased dual sport tires on it. Completely changed the bike for the better! Would like about 3 more of them in the garage.
Jun 18th 2016, 09:04 PM   #5
 Suzuki Stevo's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Seattle ,Wa

  Burgman 400, TW200, Boulevard M50, 2018 Indian Scout 1131, 2018 Indian Chieftain Classic
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parilla125
I have a 2000. The last year of kick start and drum front brake. From 1986 to 2000 they remained unchanged except colors. In 2001 they changed the carb to a more conventional one, put on a bigger alternator, dropped the kick starter, put on a front disk brake. I can't think of any other mods right now.
I bought mine new and have had no trouble with it. I think the drum brake is adequate but would prefer the disk. I like having the kick starter on mine though...
Most people put the big rack on the back which gives plenty of room. I also put a front rack on mine. There are two styles. Above the headlight or below it. Mine is 'above' so the headlight is not blocked with a load on it. Both WILL make the steering a bit more heavy feeling and slower even when empty.
These bikes are not speed demons and the engine does not lend itself to larger displacement easily. Swapping is difficult as the primary sprocket is offset to accommodate the big rear tire with the outer gear case having a bearing to support the long output shaft. That means pulling the side case to swap primary sprockets.
I have gone from a 45 tooth rear for more highway riding to a 70 tooth (on it now) for slow trail riding. I have a 60 tooth waiting to be put on. 47 rear is stock. Sprocket Supply can cut any sprocket you want for any bike, split them in half and put two master links through them for proper spacing. Now you can change sprockets without pulling the rear tire.
The 45 was good for 55 mph with short runs to 60-65 mph but it was wound pretty tight. The stock tires howl LOUDLY at that speed.
The other thing those huge tires do is throw whatever you are riding through everywhere. Mostly your legs. First time I went through deep water and mud with a little speed I had to concentrate on riding out of it while laughing hysterically because of the ridiculous amount of mud and water it threw all over me. I would probably buy another if I didn't have mine.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cool1442
I sold some of the early models. They can be a little bouncy (due to fat tires) on bumpy steep down hills if you get too much speed. They last forever
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bald Guy
I have one in my training fleet. Love that damn thing! I put some street biased dual sport tires on it. Completely changed the bike for the better! Would like about 3 more of them in the garage.
Thanx, now I know I must own one

Edited by Suzuki Stevo on Jun 19th 2016 at 03:09 PM
Jun 19th 2016, 02:55 PM   #6
 ZXtasy's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Moses Lake, WA

  2013 Kawasaki Concours C-14, 2005 ZX-10R Kawasaki (Nekkid), '99 Yamaha TW-200
We have 2, neighbors have 2, niece and bf have 2....great little Trail Whales.


sunofnun and Parilla125 like this.
Jun 19th 2016, 04:23 PM   #7
 Scribbles's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  NW

My first motorcycle was a 87 TW200 (in 1989). They have a good side and a bad side..

The good;
Inexpensive, low seat height, elec start, easy to ride and every bit as tough as the legendary XR200.

the bad;
underpowered, (barely able to do highway speeds), heavy, worthless drum brakes (especially when wet) just try stopping a 260 lb bike from 60 MPH with drum brakes.. that will put the fear of God in you.. (Don't ask me how I know..) The oldr bikes with front drum brakes should be illegal on the highway.
Very little suspension (4 inches of travel?). One reviewer compared the TW200 suspension to a couch sliding down a flight of stairs.
Lack of rimlocks. The big tires would provide tremendous traction if you could air them down lower than 18lbs, (some ATVs with balloon tires run at 4-6 lbs)but without rimlocks that is disastrous. (I spun the rear tire and ripped the valve stem out of the tube on mine..) Yamaha wanted $87 dollars for the stock tube. A tire shop sold me one that fit for $4.

they make a great beginners bike, but they are not worth raving over..

The XT225 is a better bike, I'd even take an older EX250 with knobbies over the TW200..

Edited by Scribbles on Jun 19th 2016 at 04:51 PM
Jun 19th 2016, 07:21 PM   #8
 Parilla125's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  SeaTac

That might be a little a little harsh. Bikes had drum brakes for a long time before disk brakes became normal. It just makes you a little more careful... And underpowered? For what? A 200? Buy a bigger bike if you want more performance.
I did about 16 miles over some fairly rough areas today on mine. Didn't do it fast so it was Ok. They are not really meant for high speed running anyway.
Jun 19th 2016, 09:45 PM   #9
 liberpolly's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Seattle

  Ducati Diavel, Aprilia Scarabeo
Why not WR250R?

(really curious, not trying to argue)
Jun 20th 2016, 01:54 AM   #10
 Scribbles's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  NW

Quote:
Originally Posted by Parilla125
And underpowered? For what? A 200?
Yes, under-powered for a 200,

TW200 16hp
XT225 20hp
WR250R 30 hp
EX250 37 hp

Drum brakes may have been the standard once, but how many street legal bikes were designed in the late 80s with a front drum brake?

Quote:
Originally Posted by liberpolly
Why not WR250R?
The WR is a great bike, it's only flaw is that some riders find the seat is too tall. < 37 inches>

Edited by Scribbles on Jun 20th 2016 at 02:00 AM
Jun 20th 2016, 03:42 AM   #11
 Tombraider2's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Arlington

I look daily on CL, there is a pair still. Price keeps going down, and a single with a dent in tank right side. Last year I was looking at trading off the DRZ for one but no bites. My Dad had one, he could get about 70 out of it that was Tapped out...
Jun 20th 2016, 07:13 AM   #12
 Parilla125's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  SeaTac

Yes, under-powered for a 200,

TW200 16hp
XT225 20hp
WR250R 30 hp
EX250 37 hp



Figured since you went over on CC's I would go the same or the same amount less... I have seen spec's for the TW200 showing 18 HP. That said:

CRF 150 12 HP
XL175 15 HP
XL200 18 HP
Twinstar 200 17HP

The TW is not that much different than 'standard' engines of the same size unless you get into more 'high performance' engines on the competition bikes.

The bottom line is you don't buy one of these to attack the motocross track or fly over flat tops. They are heavy, quirky, have HUGE tires, and appeal to the people they appeal to. A manufacturing run of 30 years nearly unchanged is a pretty good run...

Sure, you can get a bike with more HP. Does it have the big tires? Low seat height?

Buy a bike made for and set up the way you are going to use it.
Jun 20th 2016, 07:34 AM   #13
 Suzuki Stevo's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Seattle ,Wa

  Burgman 400, TW200, Boulevard M50, 2018 Indian Scout 1131, 2018 Indian Chieftain Classic
TW=Trail Wing
Jun 20th 2016, 08:59 AM   #14
 Scribbles's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  NW

TW is short for Trailway. (Trailwing is a tire, and a horrible tire for offroad.. some people call them Deathwings..)

I'm not trying to talk anyone out of buying one, just posting my honest opinion as a former owner. If I was in the market for a dualsport of that size I would be looking at the XT225/250 or a KLR250.

Edited by Scribbles on Jun 20th 2016 at 10:03 AM
Jun 20th 2016, 10:07 AM   #15
 Suzuki Stevo's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Seattle ,Wa

  Burgman 400, TW200, Boulevard M50, 2018 Indian Scout 1131, 2018 Indian Chieftain Classic
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scribbles
TW is short for Trailway. (Trailwing is a tire, and a horrible tire for offroad.. some people call them Deathwings..)

I'm not trying to talk anyone out of buying one, just posting my honest opinion as a former owner. If I was in the market for a dualsport of that size I would be looking at the XT225/250 or a KLR250.
Yeah..I knew it was Trail something, pretty much the planned use for it though, I have an 18 year old daughter and my WR250R is too tall in the saddle for her and ultimately in the end it will be mine, I have been interested in them for quite some time also.

Edited by Suzuki Stevo on Jun 20th 2016 at 10:31 AM
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