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May 19th 2017, 07:01 PM   #31
 307T's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Washington County

  H-D
Quote:
Originally Posted by Transported
Wouldn't having to compete in several types of races on several types of bikes make racing more prohibitive, not less?
Sure it would, and that was the rub. You needed sponsorship or have a big bank account to race competitively. Gary Scott is a good example. An up and coming rider in the early 70s, he eventually signed on with the Harley team. One year, after a dispute with the Milwaukee team, he quit and went independent. At the time, there was a claiming rule designed to keep the field (relatively) fair for rider's competing against the various factories. Scott kept himself competitive and pissed off Yamaha and Harley factory teams by buying/claiming their bikes post-race to use for himself at subsequent events. I don't recall the details but I believe the AMA killed that rule.

Yes, it is very expensive to have a competitive scooter even if you are a talented rider. Perhaps that was the justification for splitting the series but I suspect it still costs big bucks to compete in any of the series.
May 19th 2017, 07:15 PM   #32
 Willow's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Silverdale, WA

  848evo, DRZ400SM, XR100
If I EVER put my sportbike up for sale......for a cruiser...........Please punch me in the nose.........

The sportbike will never fall from my garage, unless I'm 90 and lost my mind and have no balance anymore, but then I may still try to drag thee old legs over the sportbike for another ride......
May 19th 2017, 09:13 PM   #33
 equinity's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Puyallup

  Yamaha FZ1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Willow
If I EVER put my sportbike up for sale......for a cruiser...........Please punch me in the nose.........

The sportbike will never fall from my garage, unless I'm 90 and lost my mind and have no balance anymore, but then I may still try to drag thee old legs over the sportbike for another ride......
Remember you asked for it.

Sent via SM-G930V
Willow likes this.
May 19th 2017, 09:30 PM   #34
 That One Guy's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Beaverton

I like Peter Jones writing, and I have a good amount of respect for him as he's been around the block. But it's just his opinion, aka this piece is op-ed.

To each their own.

As I get older I tend to agree with his statements in this article, but that's just my perspective. I tend to favor my "comfortable" bike on the street more these days. No farings to take off for maintenance, my back feels better after a ride, a power band I can use VS huge top end power.... the usual old man stuff. But are sport bikes going away? Not anytime soon.
Parilla125 likes this.
May 19th 2017, 11:08 PM   #35
 liberpolly's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Seattle

  Ducati Diavel, Triumph Street Twin
Not surprising at all. Maybe it's because I learned to ride late in life, but I have zero interest in sportsbikes and don't see a point of owning one for street riding. Standards disguised as sportsbikes, that's another matter.
May 20th 2017, 03:40 AM   #36
 Suzuki Stevo's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Seattle ,Wa

  Burgman 400, TW200, Boulevard M50 & C90T, 2018 Indian Scout 1131
Quote:
Originally Posted by Astair1299
It's not about handle bars vs. clip-ons. Our country is run by advertising...simple as that.
I remember back in the 80's, Motocross Action Magazine (IIRC??) did an article on how to get a larger area on MX bikes for advertising, one of the ideas was something like a CARTOON SIZE large number plates (but not for #'s) back around the rear tires to give sponsors a larger area for their name. All of this was in the interest of attracting sponsors and money to push MX Racing more into the mainstream.....the paper trail is green
May 20th 2017, 08:21 AM   #37
 VeritasImageryNW's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Allyn, WA

  '06 HD Street Bob, '85 Yamaha FJ600, '99 Honda CBR600f4
Quote:
Originally Posted by That One Guy
I like Peter Jones writing, and I have a good amount of respect for him as he's been around the block. But it's just his opinion, aka this piece is op-ed.

To each their own.

As I get older I tend to agree with his statements in this article, but that's just my perspective. I tend to favor my "comfortable" bike on the street more these days. No farings to take off for maintenance, my back feels better after a ride, a power band I can use VS huge top end power.... the usual old man stuff. But are sport bikes going away? Not anytime soon.
I agree with this, to some extent, but Peter was the one who decided to toss in racing as an arguing point rather than sticking to street riding. No, not many people want to spend a lot of time on a race bike on the street, just as most people would never want to drive a real race car down to the local grocery store and post office. Been there, done that. When I was younger I had a '70 Mustang Fastback that was street legal, but set up for autocrossing and vintage road racing. The thing was absolutely brutal to drive on the street. No power steering, no carpet, full cage, stiff suspension, all that jazz. Sure, it was fun every once in a while, but not for everyday use.

But back to Peter's main argument, he points to low ticket sales as proof of the death of sportbikes. He talks about MotoAmerica and how they should make the SuperBike class nakeds. He originally states that no one wants a race bike for the street, but then talks about racing. But there is no correlation between the two. The reasons for low ticket sales and low sport bike sales are totally different issues. Ticket sales are low, because they always have been, because road racing in this country doesn't have the draw, and it never really has (other than during the sixties when we had tracks all over and even had international sports car racing at SiR/Pacific). But that doesn't translate over to why sport bike sales are slowing. That has more to do with things like comfort, and probably more impactful, price. The technology that goes into making the most up-to-date sport bike means that the costs go up. And as technology makes the bigger bikes easier to ride, that opens the door for more people to choose the liter bikes, which being larger are more comfortable for the average tall American. And now with the Euro4 regs making the cost of designing a compliant 600 nearly the same as designing a 1000, it makes no sense for manufacturers to continue with that class. Who's going to be willing to spend the same money for a 600 as it would be to buy a 1000?

But back to the topic Peter started, racing and street riding should never be compared. Racing should always be that area that pushes the bikes and technology farther. F1 cars are nothing like street cars, but that technology trickles downward into what we all drive, making them safer, faster, and more economical. The same is true for bikes. So, maybe sport bikes are selling slower, but that doesn't mean they are dying. And it certainly doesn't mean we should do away with them in racing.
HalcyonSon likes this.
May 20th 2017, 08:56 AM   #38
 Texasl's Avatar
Moderator
 
  Jan 2016
  Northeast Olalla

  07 Guzzi
Quote:
Originally Posted by Willow
If I EVER put my sportbike up for sale......for a cruiser...........Please punch me in the nose.........

The sportbike will never fall from my garage, unless I'm 90 and lost my mind and have no balance anymore, but then I may still try to drag thee old legs over the sportbike for another ride......
You don't sell the sport bike for a cruiser, you keep the sport bike and add a cruiser to the fleet.
VeritasImageryNW likes this.
May 20th 2017, 09:00 AM   #39
 VeritasImageryNW's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Allyn, WA

  '06 HD Street Bob, '85 Yamaha FJ600, '99 Honda CBR600f4
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texasl
You don't sell the sport bike for a cruiser, you keep the sport bike and add a cruiser to the fleet.
Or vise versa.
May 20th 2017, 04:24 PM   #40
 Sentinel's Avatar
 
  Jun 2016
  Poor Tortured

  2015 Kawasaki Concours 14 - The Origame Dragon
I wonder how much the interwebs and video games are keeping young people away from outdooor and go-to activities, racing or anything else. I know my own adult children (25-ish) spend their free time in front of a screen and not in some arena or venue with a bunch of other people. can't say i blame them. driving, parking, lines, crowds, bad food, crowds, driving....no thanks.
May 20th 2017, 05:44 PM   #41
 Parilla125's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  SeaTac

As I have aged there are a number of statements I made like, "I will never quit ___", that I have changed my mind on. Things change as you get older...
We had a 2012 Kawasaki ZX14R that was an awesome motorcycle. Well, except for the riding position. Traded it in on a UTV (off road side by side) after I deemed it to be a hazard to me when it was getting hard to get my feet down off of the foot pegs. That was after installing a set of lowering pegs! That and the body position made it awkward to support when stopped and or maneuvering.
Ordered a handlebar kit for my Yamaha R3 to get them up a bit. If the MT03 (naked version) was in the US I would have bought one of them instead. Not sure if sportbikes are completely dead, but I do understand why they are fading a bit.
The movement seems to be going back to the 'standard' motorcycle. More upright, more comfortable seat. Does that mean ridiculous choppers are next to come back around?
May 21st 2017, 02:36 PM   #42
 Willow's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Silverdale, WA

  848evo, DRZ400SM, XR100
Quote:
Originally Posted by equinity
Remember you asked for it.

Sent via SM-G930V
Shoot..........I can hardly even remember yesterday....don't worry, I'll forget and wonder why I just got punched in the nose

Quote:
Originally Posted by Texasl
You don't sell the sport bike for a cruiser, you keep the sport bike and add a cruiser to the fleet.
Hmmm...........Now that's an interesting thought....
Texasl likes this.
May 21st 2017, 03:34 PM   #43
 liberpolly's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Seattle

  Ducati Diavel, Triumph Street Twin
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sentinel
I wonder how much the interwebs and video games are keeping young people away from outdooor and go-to activities, racing or anything else.
I would guess none. Homebodies in old times would watch TV, read dumb magazines, and gossip on the phone. People who had better things to do then have better things to do now.
May 22nd 2017, 07:38 AM   #44
 HalcyonSon's Avatar
 
  Apr 2016
  Renton

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sentinel
I wonder how much the interwebs and video games are keeping young people away from outdooor and go-to activities, racing or anything else. I know my own adult children (25-ish) spend their free time in front of a screen and not in some arena or venue with a bunch of other people. can't say i blame them. driving, parking, lines, crowds, bad food, crowds, driving....no thanks.
You can have both... There are days like yesterday where I just want to hang out on the couch and watch Netflix, fuck around with mobile games, and kick the shit out of Deadpool with Wolverine on the Xbox. That after spending all day Saturday on the bike, talking about bikes, and drinking with other riders at the end of the day. The folks that would rather spend every day and night in front of a screen were never going to be on a bike to begin with.
May 24th 2017, 01:09 AM   #45
 Damon Mon Wai's Avatar
Inspector Gadget
 
  Jan 2016
  Seattle

I first started riding sport bikes when I was 14. That was 35 years ago. Since then I 've ridden all kinds of street bikes. Cruisers, full touring, sport touring, standards, supermotos... But for me nothing is as fun and comfortable as a full on sport bike. I have no problems riding all day on sport bikes, I find the more upright seating position of cruisers and standards more uncomfortable. I love the relatively light weight, power, handling and braking of sport bikes. I love to brake hard, corner fast and accelerate hard. I don't usually ride fast on the street because I just have to wait a few days or a week for my next track day. But in the mountains and hills when the road is open and clear I'll ride faster relative to the posted speed limit. But even around town or commuting I love the comfort and ergonomics of sport bikes.
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