Instagram     

Go Back   PNW Moto > PNW Moto > Motorcycles

Motorcycles For topics and discussions about all motorcycle makes and models

Like Tree8Likes
  • 5 Post By MrPersonality
  • 1 Post By MMcN49
  • 1 Post By Sentinel
  • 1 Post By DocB
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Oct 6th 2018, 05:57 PM   #1
 
  Mar 2018
  Gig Harbor

  2008 BMW R1200GS Adventure
Protecting For Winter Riding

Iím riding all year. Iíve heard the stuff they spray on the roads here will eat the bike up pretty bad if itís not cleaned or protected.

What should I be using and how often should I be using it?
Oct 6th 2018, 07:37 PM   #2
 MrPersonality's Avatar
 
  Feb 2016
  Kent (Cheese-Hill)

  Yamaha FZ-09
I have been riding year-round up here for 20 years and have never had an issue with road chemicals damaging any of my bikes.

Just wear good waterproof winter gear and knock the road grime off of the bike with a hose from time to time until the weather gets warm enough to give it a regular washing.
Oct 7th 2018, 05:14 AM   #3
 MMcN49's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Small Island Surrounded by Puget Sound

  07 Buell XB12STT, (Two) 12 Suzuki DR650 SE 72BMWR75/5 KIA @ 243K
If you ride through a puddle, slush or wet area on a treated road the spray can get onto the brake caliper pistons and corrode them. They are not easiest to thoroughly clean with a garden hose. That's about the only issue I had after many years of commuting on a bike.

Winter gear is fine but as I've grown older I now need heated gloves and boot liners for the fingertips and toes on longer rides.
Didley likes this.
Oct 10th 2018, 10:50 AM   #4
 
  Jun 2016
  Portland area

I spray all electrical connectors inside and out with acf50. Sold on Amazon. Brits use it to keep the winter salt from killing their motos. Tutoro chain oiler takes care of the other issue.

Sent via SM-G930V
Oct 10th 2018, 03:18 PM   #5
 Sentinel's Avatar
 
  Jun 2016
  Poor Tortured

  2015 Kawasaki Concours 14 - The Origame Sea-Dragon
my old ninja got some of that stuff on it on one single ride where I ended up in the wet right after they sprayed Car-Rusto-Spray (tm) on the roads and started to get corrosion immediately on all the regular steel stuff that was exposed. it is BAD NEWS and does not wash off easily. YES - it will cause rust. a lot. and fast. this stuff might be the one case in which a power washer is the right answer for a motorcycle.
Didley likes this.
Oct 10th 2018, 03:49 PM   #6
 DocB's Avatar
 
  Feb 2016
  Poulsbo, WA

  Aprilia RSV Mille, CB77 (AMA Nat'l landspeed record holder), CB750K, CB750F
It's worth getting some dielectric grease and coating the contacts of electrical connectors with it. Humidity is a real problem here but most roads just get sanded. If you do get into salt a solution of sodium carbonate (washing soda) will neutralize it (old salt racer trick). Vinegar solution is supposed to work too, but I haven't tried it.
Oct 10th 2018, 04:03 PM   #7
 Chrishil54's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Kirkland

  2009 V-Star 1100 Custom
Quote:
Originally Posted by DocB
It's worth getting some dielectric grease and coating the contacts of electrical connectors with it. Humidity is a real problem here but most roads just get sanded. If you do get into salt a solution of sodium carbonate (washing soda) will neutralize it (old salt racer trick). Vinegar solution is supposed to work too, but I haven't tried it.
It's easy to make.
Spread about 2 cups of Baking Soda in a flat baking pan.
Bake in a 400 degree oven for about 45 - 60 minutes.
Take out and stir then flatten it back out.
Bake another 45-60 minutes.


Once done, it will have a slight yellow color to it.

** CAUTION Wear gloves and wear a respirator mask when handling washing soda, even during the stirring process. It is a very fine and corrosive powder that can get into the lungs. **
Oct 10th 2018, 08:48 PM   #8
 
  Jun 2016
  Portland area

Dielectric grease doesn't penetrate deep enough into the crimps where the corrosion occurs.

Sent via SM-G930V
Oct 10th 2018, 09:12 PM   #9
 DocB's Avatar
 
  Feb 2016
  Poulsbo, WA

  Aprilia RSV Mille, CB77 (AMA Nat'l landspeed record holder), CB750K, CB750F
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chrishil54
It's easy to make.
Spread about 2 cups of Baking Soda in a flat baking pan.
Bake in a 400 degree oven for about 45 - 60 minutes.
Take out and stir then flatten it back out.
Bake another 45-60 minutes.


Once done, it will have a slight yellow color to it.

** CAUTION Wear gloves and wear a respirator mask when handling washing soda, even during the stirring process. It is a very fine and corrosive powder that can get into the lungs. **
You probably wouldn't really need two cups, maybe just a cup in a two gallon bucket. IME that much will convert in about 20 minutes. Color doesn't change so much as texture. It gets more coarse. Or just buy Arm and Hammer washing soda.
Oct 11th 2018, 05:54 AM   #10
 MMcN49's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Small Island Surrounded by Puget Sound

  07 Buell XB12STT, (Two) 12 Suzuki DR650 SE 72BMWR75/5 KIA @ 243K
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hachi
Dielectric grease doesn't penetrate deep enough into the crimps where the corrosion occurs.

Sent via SM-G930V
True, but CRC 2-26 does. Three Bucks at Home Depot.
https://www.crcindustries.com/produc...-oz-02007.html
https://www.homedepot.com/p/CRC-2-26...2004/100398344
Oct 11th 2018, 06:50 AM   #11
 
  Jun 2016
  Portland area

crc226 is good, but acf50 is better because it protects all surfaces not just electrical. Just apply it each fall.

Sent via SM-G930V
Oct 11th 2018, 12:31 PM   #12
 DocB's Avatar
 
  Feb 2016
  Poulsbo, WA

  Aprilia RSV Mille, CB77 (AMA Nat'l landspeed record holder), CB750K, CB750F
According to the MSDS it's hydrotreated lube oil thinned with naptha.

For something a little more space age and quite a bit more involved one might try treating electrical contacts with Caig DeOxit (we use this stuff all the time in my lab) or ProGold and then applying Stabilant22A, which is a poloxamer thinned with isopropyl alcohol. The cool thing about that stuff is that unlike oil or silicone it becomes conductive in the presence of an electrical potential, and thus worn contacts can actually work better with it on there. It also inhibits corrosion.
Didley likes this.
Oct 11th 2018, 01:14 PM   #13
 MMcN49's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Small Island Surrounded by Puget Sound

  07 Buell XB12STT, (Two) 12 Suzuki DR650 SE 72BMWR75/5 KIA @ 243K
Quote:
Originally Posted by DocB
According to the MSDS it's hydrotreated lube oil thinned with naptha.

For something a little more space age and quite a bit more involved one might try treating electrical contacts with Caig DeOxit (we use this stuff all the time in my lab) or ProGold and then applying Stabilant22A, which is a poloxamer thinned with isopropyl alcohol. The cool thing about that stuff is that unlike oil or silicone it becomes conductive in the presence of an electrical potential, and thus worn contacts can actually work better with it on there. It also inhibits corrosion.
As usual, a wealth of information Doc. With the price difference though, CRC works very well. Working in the Commercial Marine Industry all those years I've used Cosmoline and the newer lighter replacements for corrosion protection. Never thought to use it on electrical connectors.
Oct 11th 2018, 09:09 PM   #14
 DocB's Avatar
 
  Feb 2016
  Poulsbo, WA

  Aprilia RSV Mille, CB77 (AMA Nat'l landspeed record holder), CB750K, CB750F
It often pays to research what is really in the various cans of stuff someone is selling as the new cure. I restore Nagra tape decks. These are lovely Swiss made decks that were the pinnacle of sound recording in the film and videotape industry, the biggest models sold for around $30K back in the 80s. Nowadays they are all the rage for high end audiophiles. I have 6 coming in for restoration over the next few months.

There are a couple of bearing surfaces that require about a drop each of a special lubricant that is called out in the service manual. So I will need 12 drops of the stuff. It comes from a German company and IIRC it costs around $130 a liter, with a minimum 1 case order.

After doing a fair amount of research it turned out to be identical to a lubricant used in 50s and 60s era turbojets. That stuff is still available from Shell Oil and costs about $20 a quart.

I leave it as an exercise for the reader to figure out which one we keep in the lab.
Oct 12th 2018, 04:33 AM   #15
 
  Mar 2018
  Gig Harbor

  2008 BMW R1200GS Adventure
Great information, gentlemen. Thank you.
Reply

  PNW Moto > PNW Moto > Motorcycles

Tags
protecting, riding, winter



Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Anyone sick of this winter yet???!!! PuReGeNiUs Bellingham 58 Feb 23rd 2018 04:11 PM
Old man winter still reigns... route246wraith Seattle 7 Feb 23rd 2018 09:32 AM
For Sale: Winter jacket RamboRemo Classifieds 1 May 25th 2016 11:48 AM
NMA - Protecting your right to ride tod701 Adventure Riding 1 Jan 22nd 2016 08:42 PM




Copyright © 2018 PNW Moto. All rights reserved.