Instagram     

Go Back   PNW Moto > PNW Moto > Motorcycles

Motorcycles For topics and discussions about all motorcycle makes and models

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Jul 28th 2017, 11:26 AM   #1
 Basco2's Avatar
 
  Feb 2016
  Mill Creek/Snohomish

  DRZ 400SM
Motorcycles and Military

I didn't see this posted so I thought I would share. It is a short article but still interesting. I wasn't expecting to see Christini mentioned but it makes total sense.

Link to article: These are the high-tech 2-wheelers America?s top troops ride into battle | We Are The Mighty

They mention a bike called Nightmare so I had to see it:


SilentHawk

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
These are the high-tech 2-wheelers America's top troops ride into battle

For more than 100 years, troops have been zipping around combat zones on motorcycles. From early uses as transports for messengers plying the scarred landscape of Flanders in World War I, to steeds shuttling reconnaissance troops maneuvering for a low-profile look-see in Europe to today’s special operations troops using specially-designed all-terrain dirt bikes in search of America’s enemies, the military uses motorcycles for its specialized missions more than ever.

In fact, one of the first times U.S. troops used motorcycles in combat was when Gen. George “Blackjack” Pershing ordered Harley-Davidson J Series bikes to hunt down Poncho Villa in Mexico in 1914.

With their relatively light weight, high speed and endurance and energy efficiency, military motorcycles were proven time and again to be able to get troops to an objective when no other vehicle could — and get them out fast when things go sideways.

These stealthy steeds were used in some novel ways during World War I, with the U.S. military fielding nearly 100,000 to troops fighting in Europe. These bikes were loaded with machine guns for attacking enemy trenches, deployed with gurneys to transport wounded and used as messenger and reconnaissance vehicles to pass vital information and spy on enemy formations.

World War II saw even more use for military motorcycles, with Harley Davidson dominating the market for U.S. troops. This time vehicle technology had progressed so much that the Jeep Willy eventually eclipsed the motorcycle for go-anywhere transport and the two-wheelers were used primarily for message delivery and scouting.

By the Cold War, communications technology and armored designs made tooling around the battlefield on a motorcycle a dicey proposition. But that’s when America’s secret warriors started casting their gaze toward the technology for low-viz operations.

It’s well known that the Marine Corps had a unit of motorcycle troops for decades and that Air Force Special Tactics troops like Combat Controller Teams used the two-wheelers for remote landing strip surveys and long-range transport. The commandos (and Marines) tended toward offroad or Enduro-style bikes, with all-terrain capability and durable suspensions.

Today’s special operators are emphasizing hybrid technology that allows the bike to run on quiet electricity and recharge with a gas-fueled motor when stealth isn’t as important. Two prototype bikes, the Silent Hawk by Logos and the Nightmare from LSA Autonomy, are part of an ongoing program run by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or DARPA, to deliver commandos a truly flex-fueled motorcycle.

These high-tech bikes can run on just about any kind of fuel, including JP-8 jet fuel and propane, and can switch to a quiet electric motor for silent insertions. When the motor’s running, the engine purrs at a whispery 80 decibels, about the same amount of noise as a vacuum cleaner.

While these bikes may still be a few years off before they’re deployed to worldwide combat zones, special operations units are setting their sights on today’s motorcycles that can go anywhere and are much easier to operate than standard ones.

A recent solicitation for industry from Air Force Special Operations Command calls for an order of Christini All-wheel Drive motorcycles for its special tactics teams. The Christini’s AWD capability “adds an element of control and capability that is not available on other motorcycles with the exact same overall weight,” the Air Force says.

The 450cc motorcycle uses a so-called “Rekluse” automatic clutch that allows the commando to stop at a moment’s notice without stalling and continue on without going through restart procedures, delivering “the operator an extreme tactical advantage on the battlefield.”

The Christini also has flex-foam run-flat tires that can take bullets and keep going “making a flat tire impossible,” the Air Force says.

Clearly, from the pre-World War I Army to the most elite special operators of today, the motorcycle is here to stay as an option for stealthy, all-terrain transport to get troops where they’re needed in any clime and place.
Reply

  PNW Moto > PNW Moto > Motorcycles

Tags
military, motorcycles



Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Vinces motorcycles SmokeyMcNug Olympia 9 Sep 16th 2016 07:46 PM
Military Trackday ***July 18th*** Luckyadam12 Track 25 Mar 15th 2016 09:22 AM
Motorcycles? What are Those!? Tuskano New Users 6 Mar 6th 2016 03:19 AM
FIRST: Anybody here ride motorcycles? Ever? sunofnun Motorcycles 47 Feb 13th 2016 10:20 AM
Motorcycles Are Scary WHO is DANE New Users 11 Jan 20th 2016 06:30 PM




Copyright © 2017 PNW Moto. All rights reserved.