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Mar 13th 2016, 08:05 AM   #1
 no splat matt's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Beaverton

  With a grin on my face
GPS tracking device recommedations

I want to install a GPS tracker on my bike should I ever become incapacitated after an accident when riding solo. It needs to be mountable on the bike. Anyone have any recommendations?
Mar 13th 2016, 08:16 AM   #2
 2wheelpodcast's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Medford Oregon

Its probably better to have one on your body. I know skiers and snowmobile riders have them.

http://www.outdoorgearlab.com/Person...Beacon-Reviews
Mar 13th 2016, 08:24 AM   #3
 Rainman's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Bot Hell, WA

  Honda RC51, BMW S1000RR, BMW R1200RT, Suzuki DR650SE
Get a SPOT Gen-3, and keep it on your person so if you and the bike part ways, they can find you.
2wheelpodcast likes this.
Mar 13th 2016, 08:33 AM   #4
 Rainman's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Bot Hell, WA

  Honda RC51, BMW S1000RR, BMW R1200RT, Suzuki DR650SE
Think of this,... in the event of an off on a lonely road, wouldn't you want to be able to set off the emergency signal by yourself and on your person rather than maybe not being able to drag yourself to the bike down a gully, or waiting for hours until somebody notices the signal isn't moving?
Mar 13th 2016, 09:36 AM   #5
 Candiya's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Bremerton

  BMW F800R, Honda CBR250R
I have a Delorme InReach. (FWIW, Delorme was just purchased by Garmin. I'm not sure if this will make any difference in their service.)

I prefer the InReach over the SPOT because it offers 2-way texting capability through the satellite network. For me, this is important so I can confirm that help is on the way. Or if it's not an emergency, but I'm stuck on the side of the road, I can text friends to come pick me up, even if I don't have cell service. However, it is more expensive than the SPOT. (I have the minimal service plan, which costs $12/month.)

As for where to put the device, I go back and forth on this one. Of course, if you're separated from you bike, you want to have access to the device - which argues for putting it in your pocket. On the other hand, anything hard in your pocket could potentially break bones if you land on it in a crash - which argues for putting it on the bike. I tend to put it in my tank bag and show my riding buddies where it is in case they ever need to use it when I'm incapacitated.
Mar 13th 2016, 10:27 AM   #6
 GPD323's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Spanaway

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rainman
Get a SPOT Gen-3, and keep it on your person so if you and the bike part ways, they can find you.
thats what I have been using for years. Its also allows friends and family to track you in real time when you travel. I do a lot of solo trips every year and always use it. As mentioned, attach it to your body. I use a cell phone exercise armband for my SPOT and have a short tether on it as extra precaution.
Mar 13th 2016, 10:48 AM   #7
 FeralRdr's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  The Rider's Seat

There are mounting solutions for both Delorme and SPOT devices. Delorme offers a "Powered Sports Ram Mount" as an 'in house' solution. It does require a cigarette lighter socket to power, so if going that solution you may need to install one first. Spot doesn't offer an 'in house' solution per se, but their SPOT Gen 3 can be externally powered via the USB port. You would probably still have to purchase an additional USB battery cable, but they aren't too expensive. Though SPOT doesn't provide a mount, RAM Mounts does as a third party solution.
Mar 13th 2016, 03:29 PM   #8
 
  Feb 2016
  Aloha, OR

  '15 Can Am Spyder RT-S
I carry a SPOT gen3, mostly for peace-of-mind for my wife, as I often ride alone.

-UD
Mar 13th 2016, 03:38 PM   #9
 Rodeojones's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Puyallup, WA

  2003 Honda XR250R; 2015 Honda CRF250X
I use this free app on my phone. Simple, basic, and does everything I want. I send my wife my profile address (one time) and it tracks where I am at as long app is activated. I can erase my trips when finished and with it I don't have to carry anything additional.

https://play.google.com/store/apps/d...eTracker&hl=en

EDIT: I even used it overseas when I was in Jordan last year. Not only could my wife see where I was but I used it to see how far I had walked after a long day of sight seeing.
Mar 13th 2016, 05:03 PM   #10
 tunus's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  PDX

  bikes, all kinds.
Another vote for the Inreach. I keep it in a small outside pocket of a small backpack I ride with.

Sent via Nexus 6
Mar 13th 2016, 06:33 PM   #11
 no splat matt's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Beaverton

  With a grin on my face
After reading reviews of the SPOT 3 and In Reach, just wondering how they perform for you. How often do you do a "systems check" to see how it functions? Both have a lot of negatives with regards to reliability, by that I mean functional not mechanical.
Mar 13th 2016, 08:32 PM   #12
 
  Jan 2016
  Gig Harbor

  BMW F650GS / BMW R12R
Need to see the sky

I've never used an In Reach, but a SPOT 3 generally needs a clear view of the sky to ping a satellite. Even fairly light tree cover has interrupted some of the connections that I've tried to make while backpacking. Just something to consider if you're looking for a solution to a situation where one is immobile and down in the brush or rocks, off the road. Obviously, these satellite beacons are a big help and will work great in many instances. No technology is better than a riding buddy who keeps you in sight, however.
Mar 13th 2016, 09:14 PM   #13
 tunus's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  PDX

  bikes, all kinds.
Quote:
Originally Posted by no splat matt
After reading reviews of the SPOT 3 and In Reach, just wondering how they perform for you. How often do you do a "systems check" to see how it functions? Both have a lot of negatives with regards to reliability, by that I mean functional not mechanical.
The Inreach's screen and display are fairly basic and not very high resolution, but that helps the battery last 5 days with 12hr of tracking uploads at 10 min intervals. Composing text is kind of clumsy if you do it directly from the device, but you can save up to 10 preset texts. You can connect the inreach through Bluetooth to your phone for faster message composition which also allows you to use your phone 's contact list in case you didn't save all needed numbers on the inreach. I have never had a reliability issue with connecting to the iridium network.
Mar 14th 2016, 07:21 AM   #14
 Candiya's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Bremerton

  BMW F800R, Honda CBR250R
Quote:
Originally Posted by tunus
The Inreach's screen and display are fairly basic and not very high resolution, but that helps the battery last 5 days with 12hr of tracking uploads at 10 min intervals. Composing text is kind of clumsy if you do it directly from the device, but you can save up to 10 preset texts. You can connect the inreach through Bluetooth to your phone for faster message composition which also allows you to use your phone 's contact list in case you didn't save all needed numbers on the inreach. I have never had a reliability issue with connecting to the iridium network.
+1 SPOT and InReach are on different satellite networks - at least they were when I did my research a few years ago. One of the reasons I chose the InReach was that the Iridium network was supposed to be more robust. And with the texting capability, at least I'd have a clue if the signal wasn't received by the emergency services.

That's an interesting idea to keep it in a backpack - on your person but cushioned from your body - I like it! Now I just need to start wearing a backpack.
Mar 14th 2016, 07:35 AM   #15
 tunus's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  PDX

  bikes, all kinds.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Candiya

That's an interesting idea to keep it in a backpack - on your person but cushioned from your body - I like it! Now I just need to start wearing a backpack.
I have a light weight pack which contains 2.5ltr water bladder, first aid kit and a few survival essentials should I need to spend the night on the side of a trail. The Inreach goes in an outside pocket zipped up away from the elements. It has never failed to connect even through the backpack fabric.

It's a little known fact that the Inreach can also send and receive short emails. You just need to enter email address instead of a phone number. This feature combined with preset messages and some cleverly set email rules opens up many interesting possibilities for notifying friends/family in a myriad of different scenarios.





Sent via Nexus 6
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