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  • 2 Post By HalcyonSon
  • 1 Post By Sentinel
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May 29th 2018, 02:56 PM   #1
 HalcyonSon's Avatar
 
  Apr 2016
  Renton

Eight hours, Two Bruised Hands, Three Pinched Fingers, and No More Leaks

I hate driving fork seals... This is only the second time I've had these forks apart in over ten years. The first time wasn't even a complete tear-down - just far enough to get the cartridge emulators in. I might be looking for a lathe next time around.

Disassembly went well.

Nasty, disgusting, stinking, ten-year old fork oil.



The old bits were a bit grimy, but cleaned up nice with a full can (half per fork leg) of brake cleaner and a bit of 1,000 grit.





Custom tool for the damper rod - just zapped the "L" off an allen wrench with an angle grinder and shoved it in a matching socket. Left the top cap on and had no problem getting the damper rod bolt out. This is where I expected trouble!!



I bought the damn special tool to hold the damper rod, and didn't need it. The tapered square bore tool wouldn't have worked very well for me anyway.





I don't even have pictures of where I ran into trouble. I couldn't get the oil seal down far enough to get the snap ring back in. Ran down to Cycle Gear in Auburn and bought yet another tool - the universal slide hammer gizmo fucking sucks. My hands still hurt, and my fingers are a mess because the hammer splits in half and the adjustable guide gadget is crap. I pressed the inner bushing into the outer fork leg bore as far as I could, then tried driving the oil seal in... no dice. Took the seal back off and pounded on the bushing and washer again, drove the fork seal in again, and still couldn't even see the snap ring detente. Repeat, and more grease, repeat, repeat, I can see the detente! Snap ring still won't fit... I ended up taking a small screwdriver and beating the snap ring into its detente because my hands hurt too much to bang on the seal driver any more. I'm amazed my new seals don't leak after the abuse they took. The second leg didn't go any better.

This thing is awful. And, yeah that one oddball review was right - the fingers aren't long enough to drive the bushing all the way down. I had to put the old bushing on top of the new to get enough length. I think part of the problem with driving the oil seal was that those plastic fingers spread OUT and caught on the snap ring detente, preventing the seal from driving farther in. The Motion Pro single-size version is probably much better, but they didn't have that one.

I have to give it to All Balls though - their oil/dust seal kit and inner/outer bushing kit looks EXACTLY like the stock bits. No difference in measurements at all. It's not their fault that there is ZERO free space at the top of the outer tube. I was tempted to leave the upper washer out, but imagined terrible things happening. That 1/16" of extra room for the bushing and oil seal would have been a god-send. I'm half thinking about MAKING a bit more room the next time around. It should be possible to mill the bottom of the bushing groove a touch deeper in the outer fork leg. That would give more room for the seal to go in and allow the snap ring to slip in its detente.

Other than the cluster fuck with the oil seal, the whole job was cake. It should have taken an hour or two.
PeteN95 and MotoDan like this.

Edited by HalcyonSon on May 29th 2018 at 03:01 PM
May 29th 2018, 05:49 PM   #2
 
  Mar 2018
  Gig Harbor

  2008 BMW R1200GS Adventure
It's stupid, but the pleasure I get from fixing an oil leak is pretty substantial.

Unfortunately, my wife's van has two leaking valve covers and the new gaskets came in today. It will be nice to get rid of the slow drip in the driveway, but not really how I wanted to spend my Saturday morning this weekend.
May 29th 2018, 07:54 PM   #3
 Sentinel's Avatar
 
  Jun 2016
  Poor Tortured

  2015 Kawasaki Concours 14 - The Origame Sea-Dragon
so what i hear you saying is to take your forks off and put them on yourself, but take them to a pro for refurbishing?
bcj likes this.
May 30th 2018, 07:04 AM   #4
DGA
 DGA's Avatar
Moderator
 
  Jan 2016
  PDX

  An Ape and a Husky
Well done bloody, bruised hands and all.

I just went through the same on my Tuono and can easily say that the USD forks are much, much, much easier to work on.

Time for a conversion?
May 30th 2018, 07:32 AM   #5
 HalcyonSon's Avatar
 
  Apr 2016
  Renton

Quote:
Originally Posted by DGA
Well done bloody, bruised hands and all.

I just went through the same on my Tuono and can easily say that the USD forks are much, much, much easier to work on.

Time for a conversion?
I have been tempted a few times. All Balls makes a conversion bearing to fit... well nearly any USD triple to the 650R frame. ZX-6R forks are a popular upgrade for the radial calipers. If I had it on the track I would definitely upgrade to USD, but for the street I settled on the emulators early.
May 30th 2018, 07:32 AM   #6
 HalcyonSon's Avatar
 
  Apr 2016
  Renton

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sentinel
so what i hear you saying is to take your forks off and put them on yourself, but take them to a pro for refurbishing?
Nah - just have to find the right tool. And maybe do a little dremel work.
May 30th 2018, 07:55 AM   #7
DGA
 DGA's Avatar
Moderator
 
  Jan 2016
  PDX

  An Ape and a Husky
Quote:
Originally Posted by HalcyonSon
I have been tempted a few times. All Balls makes a conversion bearing to fit... well nearly any USD triple to the 650R frame. ZX-6R forks are a popular upgrade for the radial calipers. If I had it on the track I would definitely upgrade to USD, but for the street I settled on the emulators early.
I hear ya, once you pick a route...

I still have a set of big piston forks off a '09 ZX6R sold ages ago... I think you can get them all day long for couple of hundred dollars now days.

Edited by DGA on May 30th 2018 at 08:02 AM
May 30th 2018, 12:31 PM   #8
 PeteN95's Avatar
Moderator
 
  Jan 2016
  Muklilteo, WA

  Suzuki DL1000, Honda XR650R, KTM 250 XC-W
Hope your aftermarket seals hold up, I've only had stock ones last very long at all.
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bruised, fingers, fork rebuild, hands, hours, leak, leaks, oil seal, pinched



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