Instagram     

Go Back   PNW Moto > PNW Moto > Motorcycles

Motorcycles For topics and discussions about all motorcycle makes and models

Like Tree23Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Apr 26th 2017, 02:48 PM   #1
 
  Jan 2016
  Beaverton

  2015 Kawasaki Ninja ZX6R, 2014 Kawasaki Ninja EX300 CRF250x, CRF150RB. XR100
Backpacks

I plan on commuting on my motorcycle more this summer. What is major difference between a motorcycle backpack and non-motorcycle generic style. I need to carry a 15" laptop and will be riding the Ninja ZX6R

Edited by 2wheel-Will on Apr 26th 2017 at 03:04 PM Reason: more detail
Apr 26th 2017, 02:53 PM   #2
 Chrishil54's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Kirkland

  V-Star 1100 Custom
Get a couple of saddle bags and you can store more stuff without the extra sweat inducing backpack...
Apr 26th 2017, 03:01 PM   #3
 SilvieFox's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  welches, Oregon

  2008 Kawasaki Versys (Sylvester), 1972 Suzuki RV90 (vanvan), 1981 Honda TwinStar (Bobber),yamaha 225
i personally dont waist my money(that i dont have) on "motorcycle" backpacks.. i go to goodwill and get skateboard/snowboard back packs that have huge pockets and loads of straps and nice padded shoulder straps and a chest clip (takes the load off your shoulders)
my main bag ive used for about 6-7 years now has been a (have to actully go look to find out) k2 snow urban packs. has 3 big main pockets 2 smaller front pockets a zip up side pocket and a open top (water bottle) pocket and a part in the middle that unfolds for a snow/skate board that i found to be a great place to carry my first aid kit and wet riding gear. and the main pocket is big enough to fit 2 half racks of soda
wooden and 2wheel-Will like this.
Apr 26th 2017, 03:01 PM   #4
 
  Jan 2016
  Renton

  2011 Triumph Daytona 675, 1975 Honda CB550K1
Generally the moto backpacks are designed with features in mind for motorcyclists, such as shoe storage, provisions for a hydration bladder, device pockets, spare visor storage, helmet attachment provisions like OGIO's helmet hood, weatherproof construction. I've got an older OGIO Zero Drag backpack that I commute with my work laptop, lunch, 32oz nalgene, work shoes, disc lock, half cover, and not much more.if I need more space I call pull out the helmet hood as long as the extra stuff is big enough not to fall out of that. Other than being just barely big enough for the crap I pack around, it's extremely well thought out, and newer versions offer more space.

Sent via HTC One M9
Apr 26th 2017, 03:20 PM   #5
 Josh's Avatar
 
  Jul 2016
  The Couv

I commute all the time and carry a laptop daily. I just use my "work" backpack with a laptop slot. Also commuted to college with books and stuff in a pack. Suck it up a little tighter than normal and off you go.

I agree snowboarding backpack is cool because its water resistant, just in case it rains!
wooden likes this.
Apr 26th 2017, 03:20 PM   #6
 liberpolly's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Seattle

  Triumph Street Twin
If you are commuting in rain, the water hits you at ~60 mph, which is a somewhat unique design requirement compared to other backpacks. I'd stick with motorcycle specific backpacks - I bought a couple almost new ones off craigslist, still using them once in a while 3 years later.
2wheel-Will likes this.
Apr 26th 2017, 03:39 PM   #7
 Sentinel's Avatar
 
  Jun 2016
  Poor Tortured

I crashed my ass off one time on the way to work. I was wearing a regular old cordura backpack with like a sweatshirt and my lunch in it. I got off my ZRX1200R at about...well....a bit above the speed limit, but not a lot...OK about 75. I slid along the edge of the road on my back and on my side, feet first. I came to a stop without having hit anything. My gear was shredded (Joe Rocket jacket, nylon rain pants over jeans, some generic motorcycle gloves, and lace-up work boots that came barely over the ankle. One of my boots came halfway off and my foot got some road rash. My pinkie finger on my right hand got smashed between the brake lever and the handlebar when the womans Tercel hit me on the right hand side as she changed lanes into me, and the bone shattered. I got a bit of road rash on my hip at a spot where the pants wore through. But the thing is, my back, on which I did most of the sliding, was perfect. No rash, no soreness, nothing. The backpack worked like a big, padded spine protector.

I think any stout cordura backpack is fine, although I would watch for loose, flappy straps that will whip you in the wind and could possibly hook on something like your bike, a car, or a guard rail in case of a getoff.

For over-the-top toughness, look for Maxpedition. I would not spend money on Ogio or any motorcycle specific pack.
2wheel-Will likes this.
Apr 26th 2017, 03:42 PM   #8
 WarpShatner7's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Portland

  R1200ST, CB350
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chrishil54
Get a couple of saddle bags and you can store more stuff without the extra sweat inducing backpack...
There's also the tailbag approach. Viking makes a good looking one that commutes well and acts as a shoulder/courier bag when you take it off the bike. Nelson-Rigg has a couple that double as backpacks so you can go either way with them. Generally they're meant to strap around the pillion seat but they'll usually work with a luggage rack as well.
2wheel-Will likes this.
Apr 26th 2017, 07:35 PM   #9
 Naza's Avatar
 
  Feb 2016
  Rent'n

  2002 Honda RC51, 2005 Honda RC51
Git a SwissGear backpack with all of the nice padding
Apr 26th 2017, 08:02 PM   #10
 Flyboymedic's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Hazel Dell, Wa

  Honda VFR800, Husqvarna TE 610, Ducati Hypermotard 1100S
No one has yet mentioned how the shoulder straps fit differently than a regular backpack. They're tailored so they don't pull your shoulders back like a regular backpack does.
2wheel-Will likes this.
Apr 26th 2017, 09:38 PM   #11
 Lena's Avatar
Forum Admin
 
  Jan 2016
  Portland

  Monsters
I just recently got the Ogio Mach 5 and that thing is so well designed I use it all the time, not just on my bike. I think it's their latest version, which is expandable. Waterproof shell was key, because my bike creates a water rooster tail. Flyboymedic is right - the fit is amazing compared to other backpacks, and it's got so many features specifically for riders. It fits a 15" laptop in a padded pocket. I like the overall somewhat futuristic look and the idea of accessing it from the back is brilliant.
Apr 26th 2017, 09:46 PM   #12
 TOPDECK's Avatar
 
  Jul 2016
  Mill Creek, WA

  2016 ZX-6R 636, 2017 Husqvarna 701 Supermoto
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lena
I just recently got the Ogio Mach 5 and that thing is so well designed I use it all the time, not just on my bike. I think it's their latest version, which is expandable. Waterproof shell was key, because my bike creates a water rooster tail. Flyboymedic is right - the fit is amazing compared to other backpacks, and it's got so many features specifically for riders. It fits a 15" laptop in a padded pocket. I like the overall somewhat futuristic look and the idea of accessing it from the back is brilliant.
Yup, I am one of those too that shelled out the $ for the new Mach 5. Totally worth it. Fit is amazing. Elastic bands that keep the straps from flapping, a padded spare shield holder, shoe compartment, etc. Totally worth it. I use it every day as well, even when I drive. As Lena said, the opening in the back is cool. No more forgetting to close a pocket. If you have it on, it is essentially closed. Only down side, and it is a small one, I fly a lot for work and it does not fit under an airplane seat. Oh well.
2wheel-Will likes this.
Apr 27th 2017, 07:22 AM   #13
 lazyeye's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Lebanon, OR

  2014 Honda Interceptor
I have an Ogio No Drag which has a laptop pocket. Its pretty big on the inside and is ergonomically better suited to riding with than my Chrome "Messenger" bag or the myriad laptop specific backpacks I have (I work IT).
2wheel-Will and TechRider like this.
Apr 27th 2017, 07:35 AM   #14
 PeteN95's Avatar
Moderator
 
  Jan 2016
  Muklilteo, WA

  Suzuki DL1000, Honda XR650R, KTM 250 XC-W
Quote:
Originally Posted by liberpolly
If you are commuting in rain, the water hits you at ~60 mph, which is a somewhat unique design requirement compared to other backpacks...
If the rain is hitting your backpack at 60, I don't think you're wearing it correctly?
SilvieFox likes this.
Apr 27th 2017, 07:52 AM   #15
 WarpShatner7's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Portland

  R1200ST, CB350
Anything that contributes to fatigue is bad, and if it affects your ability (or inclination) to twist around in the saddle to look over your shoulder or execute evasive maneuvers it's worse.

My suggestion is don't just think about how it feels to ride with it when you're fresh, when you try it on imagine that you're hot, you're tired, it's the end of a long day and you've been stuck in the saddle a lot longer than you expected and you have the beginning of at least one cramp in one muscle.

Not saying don't do it -- though I'm firmly in the "let the bike carry the stuff so I can stay loose" camp -- but don't settle for something because you can put up with it or adapt. It should sit on you comfortably in riding position, let you move and you should be able to deal with the loose straps once and they stay dealt with rather than have to fiddle with them before every ride ... because you won't.
2wheel-Will likes this.
Reply

  PNW Moto > PNW Moto > Motorcycles

Tags
backpack, backpacks



Thread Tools
Display Modes





Copyright © 2017 PNW Moto. All rights reserved.