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Oct 20th 2017, 09:02 PM   #1
 galenernest's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Beijing

  Honda CBF190R
Tire Pressure Gauge recommendations

Hi,

I'm going to order a few things on Amazon to have my folks bring over while they visit this winter.

I have been running into trouble finding pressure gauges for sale, so I want to order a handful on Amazon: a few of the inexpensive pencil-style gauges and one more accurate dial gauge that I can kinda splurge on a bit

Recommendations?
Oct 20th 2017, 10:57 PM   #2
 Pavement Tested's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Bremerton

  '12 Concours14, '08 GSX1300R, '06 GSX-R 750
Motion Pro's gages are the shit for the quality, splurge a bit gage. They have a digital one and a liquid filled analog one. Both are about $100 but are worth the money.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B001A...2BL&ref=plSrch

I have a digital one that goes to 60 PSI and don't use anything else on bikes.

For the pencil type I'd probably just grab a hand full of the ones from Wal-Mart or the auto parts store counter. Might even be able to find an automotive shop that would give a few for free that have their company name on them.
galenernest likes this.

Edited by Pavement Tested on Oct 20th 2017 at 10:59 PM
Oct 20th 2017, 11:02 PM   #3
 Parilla125's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  SeaTac

I have a couple nice ones but end up using the pencil type 98% of the time. They are easier to carry and I won't cry if I loose it or break it. I have found them to be pretty accurate and easy to carry so I have it handy to use.
galenernest and Rustydust like this.
Oct 21st 2017, 04:33 AM   #4
 galenernest's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Beijing

  Honda CBF190R
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pavement Tested
Motion Pro's gages are the shit for the quality, splurge a bit gage. They have a digital one and a liquid filled analog one. Both are about $100 but are worth the money.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B001A...2BL&ref=plSrch

I have a digital one that goes to 60 PSI and don't use anything else on bikes.

For the pencil type I'd probably just grab a hand full of the ones from Wal-Mart or the auto parts store counter. Might even be able to find an automotive shop that would give a few for free that have their company name on them.
Awesome. I don't know why I didn't think of Motion Pro. I think that's the gauge I'll buy (the analog option, personal choice I guess)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Parilla125
I have a couple nice ones but end up using the pencil type 98% of the time. They are easier to carry and I won't cry if I loose it or break it. I have found them to be pretty accurate and easy to carry so I have it handy to use.
Yeah, the pencil style is accurate enough for everyday use, for sure. I would probably only use the nice one to impress my friends occasionally or when I do track days and I'm trying to accurately measure cold vs. hot tire pressure... and even then the pencil gauge is probably accurate enough, but when you're at the track, ya know!

The only pressure gauge I was able to find over here goes up to 120 PSI, more for bicycles I guess... but it sucks when I'm only reading in the 15-45 PSI range.
Oct 21st 2017, 07:00 AM   #5
 FeralRdr's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Adjacent to the Hobbit Garage

This Article is a bit dated (OK... It's quite a bit dated), but it might give you a few ideas of what other brands are available,

MCN November 2005

As for me, I've been using this Tire gauge and like it a lot.

Amazon: Accu-Gage RRA60X Professional Tire Pressure Gauge with Protective Rubber Guard (60 PSI)


I have no idea how accurate it actually is; but based on the overall results of the Accu-Gauge brand in the above article, I figured that it would be good enough for my needs. Also, I figured it was probably more accurate than anything I already had,
Oct 21st 2017, 09:16 AM   #6
 GPD323's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Spanaway

Quote:
Originally Posted by FeralRdr
This Article is a bit dated (OK... It's quite a bit dated), but it might give you a few ideas of what other brands are available,

MCN November 2005

As for me, I've been using this Tire gauge and like it a lot.

Amazon: Accu-Gage RRA60X Professional Tire Pressure Gauge with Protective Rubber Guard (60 PSI)


I have no idea how accurate it actually is; but based on the overall results of the Accu-Gauge brand in the above article, I figured that it would be good enough for my needs. Also, I figured it was probably more accurate than anything I already had,

I used this one for years especially for autocross and track days. Turns out it reads 4 PSI under compared to many, many other gauges. I found cheap stick gauges to be the most accurate overall compared to other units.
Oct 21st 2017, 10:43 AM   #7
 Sentinel's Avatar
 
  Jun 2016
  Poor Tortured

  2015 Kawasaki Concours 14 - The Origame Sea-Dragon
I don't know how anyone judges accuracy without a calibrated standard. I guess "it says the same thing as X other gauges" is about as good as you can get. I think reliability - repeatability and a certain amount of toughness - matter as much as anything else, and perhaps more than whether the gauge is .01% accurate to some standard. I have a nice dial/hose gauge like the one above, though a different manufacturer (which, now that I think about it is probably made in the same Chinese factory as every other gauge that looks like that, only they put different labels on them). One thing about dial gauges is that they can be fragile. I am super careful with mine, but one time my son dropped it and I felt an electric shock of tension shoot through my body when I saw it happen and I realized I was probably being a bit of a tight-ass about it. It aint nuclear power. I gave him a stick gauge to keep in his glovebox and he uses it all the time. "The gear you wear is better than the gear you leave at home." applies here I guess. If you are trying to get a good gauge and are a person who cares enough about tires to do that, you are probably ahead of 90% of riders.

Based on M1141 </inside geekery> (double bonus points if you know what that is) you should have a gauge where your target pressure is close to the center of the dial range though, and not near the edge. So a 60psi gauge might be a bit low for some tires - assuming you use it for your bike and your truck as well. My truck tires are at 50psi and my bike tires are (targeted) at 41-42 psi for normal road riding.

Edited by Sentinel on Oct 21st 2017 at 10:47 AM
Oct 21st 2017, 11:04 AM   #8
 
  Jan 2016
  Oregon

  2017 Kaw Ninja 1000 ABS (Z1000SX)
+1 on Accugage. Right angle fitting + ribbed cover (for your pleasure)

Used em for years. The best.
Oct 21st 2017, 11:18 AM   #9
 Pavement Tested's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Bremerton

  '12 Concours14, '08 GSX1300R, '06 GSX-R 750
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sentinel
I don't know how anyone judges accuracy without a calibrated standard. I guess "it says the same thing as X other gauges" is about as good as you can get. I think reliability - repeatability and a certain amount of toughness - matter as much as anything else, and perhaps more than whether the gauge is .01% accurate to some standard. I have a nice dial/hose gauge like the one above, though a different manufacturer (which, now that I think about it is probably made in the same Chinese factory as every other gauge that looks like that, only they put different labels on them). One thing about dial gauges is that they can be fragile. I am super careful with mine, but one time my son dropped it and I felt an electric shock of tension shoot through my body when I saw it happen and I realized I was probably being a bit of a tight-ass about it. It aint nuclear power. I gave him a stick gauge to keep in his glovebox and he uses it all the time. "The gear you wear is better than the gear you leave at home." applies here I guess. If you are trying to get a good gauge and are a person who cares enough about tires to do that, you are probably ahead of 90% of riders.

Based on M1141 </inside geekery> (double bonus points if you know what that is) you should have a gauge where your target pressure is close to the center of the dial range though, and not near the edge. So a 60psi gauge might be a bit low for some tires - assuming you use it for your bike and your truck as well. My truck tires are at 50psi and my bike tires are (targeted) at 41-42 psi for normal road riding.
I'm sure you're aware that tire pressure run from 20-ish (cold pressure for my track bike rear tire is 21 PSI) to 40-ish PSI making the median presser 30-ish PSI which is dead center of the Motion Pro range of 0-60 PSI. This gage is sold as a motorcycle tire gage by a company that makes motorcycle maintenance tools and accessories, not a universal tire gage although most passenger car tires are set to about 35 PSI. Trucks and SUV's are another story as my truck tires get set to about 70-80 PSI depending on load weight.

While it is prudent to select a gage that has a range that is sufficient to place your desired pressure CLOSE to the middle of the range, that is not the most important factor. Inaccuracies most often occur in the lower 20% and top 10% of the gage range which means you should ensure you pressure is not at the extreme ends of your gage range. For example, on a 0-60 PSI gage, it should only be used to read pressures of 13-54 PSI.

20 years working in quality assurance programs that keep divers alive and submarines from hitting the ocean floor has taught me that.
Flyboymedic and tod701 like this.
Oct 21st 2017, 04:04 PM   #10
 Suzuki Stevo's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Seattle ,Wa

  Burgman 400, TW200, Boulevard M50 & C90T, 2018 Indian Scout 1131
The Accugage has been my choice for a while now and has matched the TPMS info on my Honda and Subaru to within 1/2 a pound
Oct 21st 2017, 05:19 PM   #11
 Sentinel's Avatar
 
  Jun 2016
  Poor Tortured

  2015 Kawasaki Concours 14 - The Origame Sea-Dragon
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pavement Tested

...divers alive and submarines from hitting the ocean floor ....
LOL. I was a submarine diver (SS/DV). Loved me some air.
Oct 22nd 2017, 12:06 PM   #12
 DocB's Avatar
 
  Feb 2016
  Poulsbo, WA

  Aprilia RSV Mille, CB77, CB750K, CB750F
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pavement Tested

Inaccuracies most often occur in the lower 20% and top 10% of the gage range which means you should ensure you pressure is not at the extreme ends of your gage range. For example, on a 0-60 PSI gage, it should only be used to read pressures of 13-54 PSI.

20 years working in quality assurance programs that keep divers alive and submarines from hitting the ocean floor has taught me that.
Yup, and that applies to just about any kind of metering device - torque wrenches, fuel gauges, etc.

Here's a way to avoid paying $100 to have a gauge certified. You just need access to an 8 story building - https://www.carsdirect.com/car-repai...pressure-gauge
Oct 24th 2017, 05:46 AM   #13
 galenernest's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Beijing

  Honda CBF190R
Thanks for the suggestions. The Accu-gauge looks like a decent alternative to the $85 Motion pro... I'm still leaning motion pro, however, just because it's dial is a bit larger and I'm having more and more trouble with seeing things up close. (Still don't wear glasses, but I feel like those days are numbered).
Oct 24th 2017, 10:18 AM   #14
 Parilla125's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  SeaTac

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sentinel
I don't know how anyone judges accuracy without a calibrated standard. I guess "it says the same thing as X other gauges" is about as good as you can get. I think reliability - repeatability and a certain amount of toughness - matter as much as anything else, and perhaps more than whether the gauge is .01% accurate to some standard. I have a nice dial/hose gauge like the one above, though a different manufacturer (which, now that I think about it is probably made in the same Chinese factory as every other gauge that looks like that, only they put different labels on them). One thing about dial gauges is that they can be fragile. I am super careful with mine, but one time my son dropped it and I felt an electric shock of tension shoot through my body when I saw it happen and I realized I was probably being a bit of a tight-ass about it. It aint nuclear power. I gave him a stick gauge to keep in his glovebox and he uses it all the time. "The gear you wear is better than the gear you leave at home." applies here I guess. If you are trying to get a good gauge and are a person who cares enough about tires to do that, you are probably ahead of 90% of riders.

Based on M1141 </inside geekery> (double bonus points if you know what that is) you should have a gauge where your target pressure is close to the center of the dial range though, and not near the edge. So a 60psi gauge might be a bit low for some tires - assuming you use it for your bike and your truck as well. My truck tires are at 50psi and my bike tires are (targeted) at 41-42 psi for normal road riding.
I have a certified, oil filled gauge that I put an end on off of a broken gauge. That is how I checked mine...
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