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May 13th 2016, 08:21 AM   #1
 Michael of Burien's Avatar
 
  Apr 2016
  Burien

  2005 BMW R1200GS, 2002 Honda CBR954rr
2002 CBR 954r Fork Rebuild

Ok so it's time for me to get off my ass and get this done. The seals are leaking and visibly puddling onto the rim. No bueno.

So during the winter I got together many informational materials on how to rebuild the forks. Then started to collect the new pieces I'd need. While I was at it and had them apart I'm planning on re-springing for my weight which is decidedly higher than what Honda had in mind. I'm pretty sure I've got all the stuff I'll need to completely rebuild and re-spring them.

Any tips, tricks, advice or warnings anyone would like to pose. This is now the time. Please and thank you.

I'll post up pictures and progress as I get going.
May 13th 2016, 08:55 AM   #2
 mgfchapin's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Kirkland, WA

  '15 675R
Feel free to read through this: HOW TO: Fork oil & seal change - Triumph675.Net Forums

More or less the same with your bike. Not sure what the Honda manual says but the oil level is usually wrong. Set the air gap to 110mm.

While you're in there, it's also a good idea to replace the bushings if you don't already have them. If you don't have a fork bullet to install the bushings & seals, use a condom.

With almost all other forks, I can use a damper rod holder/bleeder as aggressively as I want to get the air out. With these for some reason, you have to pump really slowly or you'll squirt fork oil right in your eyes. Ask me how I know.
May 13th 2016, 09:20 AM   #3
 Michael of Burien's Avatar
 
  Apr 2016
  Burien

  2005 BMW R1200GS, 2002 Honda CBR954rr
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgfchapin
Feel free to read through this: HOW TO: Fork oil & seal change - Triumph675.Net Forums

More or less the same with your bike. Not sure what the Honda manual says but the oil level is usually wrong. Set the air gap to 110mm.

While you're in there, it's also a good idea to replace the bushings if you don't already have them. If you don't have a fork bullet to install the bushings & seals, use a condom.

With almost all other forks, I can use a damper rod holder/bleeder as aggressively as I want to get the air out. With these for some reason, you have to pump really slowly or you'll squirt fork oil right in your eyes. Ask me how I know.
Got full seal and bushing kits. Fork bullet on its way. Should be here monday. Thanks for the info.
May 13th 2016, 10:04 AM   #4
 Squidly's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Bothell

If you're having trouble getting the seals out you can heat the outside of the fork tube to loosen it up. I used a heatgun but I've seen a dude use a torch

Edited by Squidly on May 13th 2016 at 10:06 AM
May 13th 2016, 10:33 AM   #5
 mgfchapin's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Kirkland, WA

  '15 675R
Quote:
Originally Posted by Squidly
I used a heatgun but I've seen a dude use a torch
If by "dude" you mean Dave Moss. It's a good technique and almost mandatory for Ohlins forks.
Aug 30th 2016, 06:26 AM   #6
 Michael of Burien's Avatar
 
  Apr 2016
  Burien

  2005 BMW R1200GS, 2002 Honda CBR954rr
And so it begins

Service manual check, new fluid, seals, springs and bushing check, disassembly starts...

Gee I wonder which seal failed...



That doesn't look weird at all.


Now they are ready for rebuild
Aug 30th 2016, 07:02 AM   #7
 HalcyonSon's Avatar
 
  Apr 2016
  Renton

As far as I recall, forks really aren't that difficult. It's been forever since i put the cartridge emulators in my forks. I was nervous about screwing it up, but everything worked out fine in the end. Only real pain in the ass was removing the damper rod bolt. The Ninja 650R damper rods don't have a neat slot or hex pattern so you can prevent them turning. That bitch took forever to get out even with an air impact.
Aug 30th 2016, 10:28 AM   #8
 MarvTravis's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Kirkland, WA

  Kawasaki ZX-14
There's an excellent video by Delboy's Garage that explains the full procedure in detail as he walks you through the process in real time.

He has a multitude of videos on other procedures; all are extremely well done. He explains what to do, why it's important to do it that way, and then does it correctly in real time. And, he's meticulous. I've watched all of them, and take away something from each one.
Aug 30th 2016, 04:37 PM   #9
 ZXtasy's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Moses Lake, WA

  2013 Kawasaki Concours C-14, 2005 ZX-10R Kawasaki (Nekkid), '99 Yamaha TW-200
Thread jack..wonder if I will live long enough that the fork configuration shown will be so universally common...the "old" style will be referred to as Upside Down??
Sep 12th 2016, 10:41 AM   #10
 Michael of Burien's Avatar
 
  Apr 2016
  Burien

  2005 BMW R1200GS, 2002 Honda CBR954rr
One leg done. Jesus Christ those seals are a MF'er to beat in with the seal driver.
Sep 12th 2016, 10:47 AM   #11
 mgfchapin's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Kirkland, WA

  '15 675R
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael of Burien
One leg done. Jesus Christ those seals are a MF'er to beat in with the seal driver.
They should go in pretty easily with a proper driver. Did you use seal grease?
Sep 12th 2016, 05:30 PM   #12
 Michael of Burien's Avatar
 
  Apr 2016
  Burien

  2005 BMW R1200GS, 2002 Honda CBR954rr
Ah crap. Now you tell me. What is this "seal grease" you speak of? I use a finger swipe of the 10W synthetic oil that went in the tubes. Not what I should have used I'm guessing. Well it too late now. I managed to beat those fuckers in there to the snap ring line. Blister on both hands to do it though. FML
Sep 12th 2016, 05:32 PM   #13
 Michael of Burien's Avatar
 
  Apr 2016
  Burien

  2005 BMW R1200GS, 2002 Honda CBR954rr
I purchased a Tusk brand adjustable driver. It looks like a decent (a grade above Harbor Freight. But not Snap on or factory tool).
Sep 12th 2016, 05:46 PM   #14
 mgfchapin's Avatar
 
  Jan 2016
  Kirkland, WA

  '15 675R
The adjustable ones suck. The fixed-sized drivers from Race Tech or Motion Pro are the way to go.

Lubricants
(on the far right)
Michael of Burien likes this.
Sep 12th 2016, 06:14 PM   #15
 Michael of Burien's Avatar
 
  Apr 2016
  Burien

  2005 BMW R1200GS, 2002 Honda CBR954rr
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgfchapin
The adjustable ones suck. The fixed-sized drivers from Race Tech or Motion Pro are the way to go.

Lubricants
(on the far right)
Learn something new everyday. Muchas gracias.
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